dental sealant

(redirected from Sealant (dentistry))

sealant

 [sēl´ant]
an agent that protects against access from the outside or leakage from the inside; called also sealer.
dental sealant a thin plastic coating put into the pits and fissures of teeth to act as a physical barrier to decay.

fis·sure seal·ant

a dental material usually made from interaction between bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate; such sealants are used to seal nonfused, noncarious pits and fissures on surfaces of teeth.
Synonym(s): dental sealant

dental sealant

[sē′lənt]
a plastic film coating that is applied to and adheres to the caries-free occlusal surfaces (chewing surfaces) of teeth to seal pits and fissures where plaque, food, and bacteria usually become trapped. The surface to be treated is isolated to ensure that it is not contaminated with saliva. It is then cleaned with a brush and pumice cleansing agent or micro-abraded, dried, and etched with a phosphoric acid solution. After the acid has been washed away and the tooth has been dried, the sealant is applied. Dental sealants are reported to reduce the incidence of caries in children's teeth by 50%. Also called pit and fissure sealant.

fis·sure seal·ant

(fishŭr sēlănt)
Dental material used to seal nonfused, noncarious pits and fissures on surfaces of teeth.
Synonym(s): dental sealant.