turtle

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A reptile that is a vector for campylobacteriosis, Edwardsiella tarda, salmonellosis

turtle

a reptile, member of the order Chelonia; most are aquatic or semiaquatic, fresh water or marine, but lay eggs on land. They have webbed feet or flippers and their body is covered by a horny shell from which only the legs, head and neck, and tail protrude when needed. The upper shell is called the carapace and the undershell the plastron.
There are inconsistencies in terminology. In the USA 'turtle' is used broadly for all reptiles with a shell, 'terrapin' applies to a large family, Emydidae, and 'tortoise' refers to the slow moving terrestrial species (the land turtles) that enter water only to drink or soak. In Great Britain and Australia 'tortoise' is applied generally to all members of the group except the marine species with paddle-shaped limbs which are called 'turtles'. 'Terrapin' is often used to describe the young tortoises commonly sold as aquarium pets.
Includes genera Chelonia, e.g. C. mydas (green turtle), Testudo, e.g. T. graeca (spur-thighed tortoise), T. hermanni (Hermann's tortoise), Gopherus, e.g. G. agassizi (desert tortoise), Clemmys, e.g. C. marmorata (Pacific pond turtle), Chrysemys, e.g. C. picta (painted turtle), Platemys, e.g. P. platycephala (Bolivian side-neck turtle).
References in periodicals archive ?
Every summer, thousands of female sea turtles dig nests on sandy beaches.
Many young sea turtles come here to live and eat at the end of their mysterious childhood.
According to the panel, one of the things that is having a major impact on sea turtles is the overdevelopment of coastal areas which turtles have continually used as hatching areas.
Each year, sea turtles return to the same beach locations to nest and they require beaches with specific temperatures in order to ensure proper development and hatching of the eggs.
Relative abundance and thermal and geographic distribution of sea turtles off the US Atlantic coast based on aerial surveys (1963-1969).
The farm brands itself as a conservation tourist attraction, but is actually the world's last remaining facility that commercially raises sea turtles for slaughter and consumption.
to identify relative abundance of sea turtles over time, and to detect changes in size composition with implications regarding recruitment" (TEWG, 1998).
The waters off Cape Cod are a typical sighting for sea turtles.
Sea turtles can also become stranded for other reasons, including disease, predation, strikes from vessels, and commercial fishery operations.
Around 50 sea turtles have to be rescued in Israel every year, most have been injured by boats, propellers, jet skis, fishing lines and hooks.
Six rehabilitated sea turtles (two Green Sea Turtles, two Loggerhead Turtles and two Hawksbill Turtles) will each be tagged with a satellite device that monitors their whereabouts in the earth's oceans.
Sea turtles are protected under federal law and any harassment or interference with a sea turtle, living or dead, is subject to penalty.