Scoville scale


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A system devised in 1912 by Wilber Lincoln Scoville for determining the relative ‘spiciness’ of hot peppers; under the Scoville method, a dried pepper is dissolved in alcohol, serially diluted in sugar water and given to a panel of tasters who sip increasingly diluted concentrations of peppers out of shot glass to the point at which the tasters no longer have a sensation of burning

Scoville scale

Nutrition/masochism A system devised by WL Scoville for determining the relative 'spiciness' of hot peppers; a dried pepper is dissolved in alcohol, serially diluted in sugar water and given to a panel of tasters who sip increasingly diluted concentrations of peppers. See Capsaicin, Spicy food.
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References in periodicals archive ?
A ghost chillie also measures over a million on the Scoville scale.
The US military uses pepper spray which registers at around 2m on the Scoville scale.
The awards were named after the Scoville Scale, a measurement of the spicy heat of a chile pepper.
The Scoville Scale was  assembled from sources and charts from all over the web, and from many sauce manufacturers themselves.
After several trips to various parts of the Asian continent, however, your reviewer is a fan of the higher end of the Scoville scale, so no problem here but perhaps unexpectedly spicy for some as a starter.
4MILLION on the chilli heat Scoville scale, it is 400 times hotter than a jalapeno, 600 times hotter than tabasco, 14 times hotter than the hottest curry-house vindaloo and four times hotter than every spice-lover's previous favourite fireball chilli, the Scotch bonnet.
The meal went up on the Scoville scale with the arrival of the Spicy Seafood Dumplings, which were steamed with chilli oil, but then came the two stars of the day -- Duck Dumplings, steamed with hoisin and plum sauce, a brilliant alternative to the standard Peking duck rolls, and Crab Dumplings, which are crab sticks wrapped with prawns and served on a bed of black bean sauce and burnt garlic.
5m on the Scoville scale - the universally accepted gauge of hotness - making it one of the hottest chillies available.
The Scoville scale is the measure of the hotness (capsaicin) of a chili pepper.
The pizza being offered by Little Italy Pizza Company and it rates a whopping 12million units on the Scoville scale used to rank spicy food.
Zero is bland, and a regular jalapeno pepper registers around 5,000 on the Scoville scale.
They may be small in size, but they pack a potent punch of heat, topping the Scoville Scale at 100,000 to 350,000 heat units.