Scoville scale


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A system devised in 1912 by Wilber Lincoln Scoville for determining the relative ‘spiciness’ of hot peppers; under the Scoville method, a dried pepper is dissolved in alcohol, serially diluted in sugar water and given to a panel of tasters who sip increasingly diluted concentrations of peppers out of shot glass to the point at which the tasters no longer have a sensation of burning

Scoville scale

Nutrition/masochism A system devised by WL Scoville for determining the relative 'spiciness' of hot peppers; a dried pepper is dissolved in alcohol, serially diluted in sugar water and given to a panel of tasters who sip increasingly diluted concentrations of peppers. See Capsaicin, Spicy food.
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Note: The Scoville scale rates various types of peppers according to a specific test conducted at a specific time with a specific pepper grown in a specific location.
4million on the chilli heat Scoville scale - compared with the lively jalapeno, which is just 3,500 Scovilles.
5 million on the Scoville scale and is sure to provide extreme heat without sacrificing flavor.
The curry is twice as hot as police tear gas and is rated at around six million on the Scoville scale for heat.
and ends up with 1 ounce of power-packed extract that registers 9,000,000 on the Scoville scale.
The Moruga scorpion sets mouths on fire and has registered 2 million units on the Scoville scale, which measures the hotness of peppers.
The curry measures one million units on the Scoville scale - and chefs at the Brick Lane Curry House, named after the East London street known as a UK mecca for a "ruby murray", wear masks to cook it, the Mirror reported.
The dish that took him more than an hour to eat comes in at 6 million units on the Scoville Scale of hotness -- hotter than drinking anti-riot tear gas.
The devilish fruit measures over two million on the Scoville scale - a Jalapeno by comparison is just 5,000.
You have been warned THE FIVE HOTTEST CHILLIES THE Scoville Scale, developed in 1902 by US chemist William Scoville, is used to measure the spicy heat of a chilli pepper.
Recent tests by the Warwick University in England rated the Infinity as the world's hottest when it notched up a score of 1,067,286 on the Scoville scale.