scleritis


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scleritis

 [sklĕ-ri´tis]
inflammation of the sclera. It may be superficial (episcleritis) or deep.
anterior scleritis inflammation of the sclera adjoining the limbus of the cornea.
posterior scleritis scleritis involving the retina and choroid.

scle·ri·tis

(sklē-rī'tis),
Inflammation of the sclera.

scleritis

/scle·ri·tis/ (sklĕ-ri´tis) inflammation of the sclera; it may involve the part adjoining the limbus of the cornea (anterior s.) or the underlying retina and choroid (posterior s.) .

scleritis

(sklə-rī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the sclera.

scle·rit′ic (-rĭt′ĭk) adj.

scleritis

[sklirī′tis]
Etymology: Gk, skleros, hard, itis, inflammation
an inflammation of the sclera.
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Nodular scleritis

scleritis

Ophthalmology Inflammation of sclera, most common in older adults Etiology Idiopathic, or associated with rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, metabolic disorders, infection, chemical or physical injury

scle·ri·tis

(skler-ī'tis)
Inflammation of the sclera.

scleritis

Inflammation of the SCLERA, usually as a feature of a general disease such as rheumatoid arthritis or as a complication of ophthalmic shingles (herpes zoster) or Wegener's granulomatosis. Treatment is with corticosteroid drugs often in the form of eyedrops.

scleritis 

Inflammation of the sclera, which in its severe necrotizing or in the posterior type may cause sight-threatening complications such as keratitis, uveitis, angle-closure glaucoma or optic neuropathy. It affects females more commonly than males in the fourth to sixth decades of life. Like episcleritis it has a tendency to recur. It is characterized by pain, which can be severe, redness, tearing and some patients may develop nodules (nodular scleritis). It is often associated with a systemic disease (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, polyarteritis nodosa, lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, syphilis, herpes zoster). It can involve part of the sclera, e.g. anterior scleritis (which is the most common, and it is classified as diffuse non-necrotizing or nodular non-necrotizing) or posterior scleritis. Treatment includes topical and systemic steroids and immunosuppressive drugs for very severe cases. See acute stromal keratitis; Brown's superior oblique tendon sheath syndrome.
necrotizing scleritis The most severe form of scleritis, much less common than the other types. About half the patients have one of the following diseases: rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener's granulomatosis, polyarteritis nodosa, systemic lupus erythematosus, or herpes zoster. It is characterized by pain, and white, avascular areas next to damaged areas through which one can see the brown colour of the underlying uveal tissue, and to congested areas of the sclera. In most cases visual acuity is decreased. The necrosis gradually spreads around the globe. Treatment typically consists of topical steroids, immunosuppressive agents and occasionally surgery to repair scleral or corneal perforation. See keratolysis; scleromalacia.
scleritis necroticans See scleromalacia.
posterior scleritis Inflammation of the sclera involving the posterior segment of the eye. The condition is often associated with a systemic disease (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis). It is characterized by pain and reduced visual acuity. The severity of the visual impairment depends on the involved tissue and its location. Signs include eyelid oedema, proptosis, limitation of ocular movements and, if anterior scleritis is present, redness. The ocular fundus may present disc swelling, choroidal folds, macular oedema and serous retinal detachment. Treatment consists mainly of systemic steroids and immunosuppressive agents. See choroidal folds.

scleritis

inflammation of the sclera. It may be superficial (episcleritis) or deep.

anterior scleritis
inflammation of the sclera adjoining the limbus of the cornea.
posterior scleritis
scleritis involving the retina and choroid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our patient experienced scleritis and bilateral sensorineural deafness.
of episodes Amaurosis fugax 1 Angle closure glaucoma 1 Anterior uveitis/iritis 1 Corneal abrasion 1 Corneal ulcer 1 Herpes keratitis 3 Malignant BCC/SCC/SGC 1 Marginal keratitis 2 Septal cellulitis/peri-orbital 3 Retinal tear/hole 5 Scleritis 3 Viral conjunctivitis 1 Wet AMD 1 Figure 1 Appropriateness of optometrist referral (was the referral appropriate based on outcome of assessment?
Scleritis is a more severe inflammatory condition than episcleritis.
Key Words: alendronate, bisphosphonate, scleritis, uveitis
Younger patients may get episodes of inflammation, episcleritis or scleritis and may be treated with topical steroids.
b) The patient is at risk of episcleritis and scleritis
It is important to ascertain the involvement of each of the vascular plexuses, in order to differentiate conjunctivitis from episcleritis and scleritis.
a) Non-necrotising anterior scleritis,as it is unilateral and the most common type
c) If, on insertion of 10% phenylephrine eye drops, the red appearance reduces, the diagnosis is scleritis
Posterior scleritis, severe hypertension and heavy pan-retinal photocoagulation can cause an exudative retinal detachment.
Pamidronate has been the best-studied drug in this class and positive rechallenge testing has been carried out, with scleritis recurring after a repeat drug exposure.
The weekend lectures cover topics such as the assessment and management of keratitis, blepharitis and scleritis, assessment and management of dry eye as well as practical workshops on gonioscopy for example.