scientific

(redirected from Scientificity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

scientific

(sī′ən-tĭf′ĭk)
adj.
Of, relating to, or employing the methodology of science.

sci′en·tif′i·cal·ly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
Against the current contempt for systems and strong doubts in the Cassirerian community concerning the scientific status of philosophy, I will start (1) with a reassessment of how Cassirer claimed scientificity and systematicity for every level of philosophy: for its idea as well as for the historical movement to which he belonged, neo-Kantianism, and for his philosophy of symbolic forms.
This empirical practicality of AL for teachers sits alongside and in contradiction with its theoretical claims to scientificity which, as shown earlier, was another side of its attractiveness.
3) Nanda questions the scientificity of Vedic science by citing Subhash Kak and Rammohan Roy's tendency of projecting Vedic passages as a coded form of scientific language.
Kant's own arguments in the Transcendental Analytic hardly conform to the ideal of scientificity outlined in the Architectonic.
On the contrary, the alleged continuity between the two provides yet another proof for the scientificity of the thesis.
It would seem to me that scientificity is something to strive for, not something that can simply be claimed for one's analyses.
The scientificity of physics, consequently, is not reducible to the scientificity of mathematics.
Verga thus collapses the ideological into the natural in a manner in keeping with late nineteenth-century bourgeois discourses on scientificity.
Indeed there is a curious combination of scientificity and esthetic idealization in such selenographic landmarks as Lewis Morris Rutherford's gorgeous albumen prints (produced from images taken at his private observatory in New York City in the 1860s and '70s) on which he noted the latitude and longitude of the section shown, as well as the time the photograph was taken, and James H.
In seeming contrast to this scientificity, a text of the lore of a Medieval dog saint gave the piece the feel of a reliquary.
Pearcy's notation, like much structuralist writing, seems to promise a scientificity that few literary scholars will now believe in.
Fatalist history, on the other hand, is a writing (usually of French history) that aims not to narrate but to explain, and its authors (for example, Thiers, Guizot) hold themselves to standards of objectivity, determinism, scientificity, and impartiality.

Full browser ?