scientific method

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scientific method

n.
The principles and empirical processes of discovery and demonstration considered characteristic of or necessary for scientific investigation, generally involving the observation of phenomena, the formulation of a hypothesis concerning the phenomena, experimentation to test the hypothesis, and development of a conclusion that confirms, rejects, or modifies the hypothesis.

scientific method

[sī′əntif′ik]
a systematic, ordered approach to the gathering of data and the solving of problems. The basic approach is the statement of the problem followed by the statement of a hypothesis. An experimental method is established to help confirm or negate the hypothesis. The results of the experiment are observed, and conclusions are drawn from observed results. The conclusions may tend to uphold or to refute the hypothesis.

scientific method

the way of approaching a problem by drawing up a hypothesis based on a series of observations, and then testing the hypothesis by means of experiments designed in such a way as to support or invalidate the hypothesis. On the basis of the experimental evidence a theory is proposed to account for the initial observations. If subsequently the theory is found to be wanting in some respect, new hypotheses are sought and tested experimentally, so the process is a successive refinement which in science never leads to an absolute truth, but to a more reliable knowledge.

scientific method,

n a formal style of study or research in which a problem is identified, pertinent information is assembled, a hypothesis is advanced and tested empirically, and the hypothesis is accepted or rejected.

scientific method

the process of extending knowledge by forming a hypothesis based on observations and epidemiological patterns, which is then tested on a subset of the total population, then generalizing the results to the appropriate population through the process of inductive logic. Before implementation of the hypotheses they should be tested by studies planned on the basis that the hypothesis will be proved or denied.
References in periodicals archive ?
Given that critical thinking is one aspect, and outcome of scientific thinking, the latter has been emphatically stressed in the Qur'an and the orature and literature of early Muslims and scholars.
Within the scientific thinking domain, research has repeatedly demonstrated that metacognitive support improves performance (Beishuizen, Wilhelm, & Schimmel, 2004; Lan & Repman, 1998; White & Frederiksen, 1998; Wilhelm, Beishuizen, & Van Rijn, 2005; Zion, Michalsky, & Mevarech, 2005).
The points summarized in this set of slides, once again juxtaposed with pictures of the scientists, were that (1) the scientific thought process involves personalities as well as intellect, and we should know that scientists are human; (2) the key to a successful formulation of a scientific theory is effective communication and collaboration; (3) a true researcher should be open to critical discussions with both experts and nonexperts from within and outside the field; and (4) scientific thinking involves questioning established schools of thoughts and theories in order to make pathbreaking discoveries.
have developed new fundamental methods for teaching and assessing scientific thinking.
Students should be encouraged to take higher-level courses to prepare them for scientific thinking and methodology.
It recognizes nothing between scientific thinking and mystical possession, and in so doing denies completely the sphere which it is the function of art to reconstitute by giving back to the universe its depths.
Meanwhile, from the 1960s, the social history of science honed in on further "external factors" shaping scientific thinking, like hermeticism or magic.
These were followed by his majestic Styles of Scientific Thinking in the European Tradition: The History of Argument and Explanation Especially in the Mathematical and Biomedical Sciences and Arts, published in three volumes in the summer of 1994.
Cromer has no doubt (and I share his conviction) that objectivity and scientific thinking are more than just one more way of looking at the world.
This idea of a mechanistic universe dominated scientific thinking for a little over a century, but then it became clear that the Universe was more complex than a machine could be and that it might be inherently unpredictable except in a statistical sense-if that.
In 1871 King met <IR> HENRY ADAMS </IR> in Colorado, and he has been credited with determining the noticeable turn toward scientific thinking that occurred thereafter in Adams' work.
Shingo presents six unique models, the sum of which he calls the Scientific Thinking Mechanism.

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