guidance counselor

(redirected from School counselor)
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guidance counselor

Child psychology A school worker trained to screen, evaluate and advise students on career and academic matters
References in periodicals archive ?
Data that measure the effect for individual students when they have a deep and meaningful relationship with their school counselor would better estimate the true relationship between comprehensive school counseling programs and student success.
26 /PRNewswire/ -- Barbara Micucci, a school counselor from Caley Elementary School in the Upper Merion Area School District, King of Prussia, Pa.
The leaders of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA), the professional organization that creates policy and advocates for school counselors, state:
The American School Counselor Association recommends a ratio of no more than 250 students per counselor, but in large high schools, case loads easily exceed two or three times that number.
This situation is also reflected in the fact that the counselor performs functions that are not included in the definition of the profession (American School Counselor Association [ASCA], 2012; Lambie & Williamson, 2004; Shimoni, 2005).
The departure from the traditional role of the school counselor seems to be redesigning the school counselor as an academic interventionist (Baker, 2001).
30, 2012 /PRNewswire/ --Nicole Pfleger, a school counselor from Nickajack Elementary School in Smyrna, has been named the top school counselor in America.
In response to Christopher Griffin's Student Counsel column ("High School Counselors Take it on the Chin," September 2010), the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) agrees with many of the conclusions of the Public Agenda study: More school counselors are needed, and existing counselors should not be overloaded with noncounseling duties preventing them from spending time guiding students to academic success and postsecondary education.
If trained properly, the school counselor is best suited to lead these changes in order to facilitate a climate of safety and support for these students, who are deserving of an equal opportunity to learn.
Alternative "stages," which the author believes are appropriate in tracing the history of the school counselor movement, are presented as an example of this approach.
The campaign, "Own the Turf," designed by the College Board National Office for School Counselor Advocacy (NOSCA), provides school counselors with a much-needed toolkit to help them inspire and prepare their students for college success and opportunity, and establish a college-going culture within their schools, districts and communities.
This proposal is prompted by heightened awareness of unmet student mental health needs, referrals that go unmet, school counselors displaced by other mental health providers in schools, the potential loss of the unique school counselor role, and the natural link between the mental health professional role and the array of personal-social factors that impact student achievement.
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