guidance counselor

(redirected from School counselor)
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guidance counselor

Child psychology A school worker trained to screen, evaluate and advise students on career and academic matters
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas the American School Counselor Association has designated February 5 through 9, 2018, as National School Counseling Week; Whereas school counselors have long advocated for equal opportunities for all students; Whereas school counselors help develop well-rounded students by guiding students through academic, social and emotional, and career development; Whereas personal and social growth results in increased academic achievement; Whereas school counselors play a vital role in ensuring that students are ready for both college and careers;
This study sought to understand school counselor advocacy for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) students using the theory of planned behavior (Ajzen, 2015).
According to the American School Counselor Association, the student-to-counselor ratio should be 250 students to 1, or less.
Keywords: school counselor preparation, school counselor training, school counselor perceptions, school counselor job activities
is a certified School Counselor and Teacher with the Ysleta Independent School District in El Paso, Texas; Marilyn F.
School counselors assisting students with disabilities School districts should clearly define the role of a school counselor when working with students with disabilities.
In a study of 144 building administrators three factors were identified that come into play when a potential school counselor is considered for possible employment.
In response to Christopher Griffin's Student Counsel column ("High School Counselors Take it on the Chin," September 2010), the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) agrees with many of the conclusions of the Public Agenda study: More school counselors are needed, and existing counselors should not be overloaded with noncounseling duties preventing them from spending time guiding students to academic success and postsecondary education.
The national standards of the American School Counselor Association (ASCA, 1997; Campbell & Dahir, 1997), the Transforming School Counseling Initiative (Education Trust, 1997), and the ASCA (2003, 2005) National Model have directed school counselors to respect the past and embrace the present but forge a new vision to the future.
These consultants include professional school counselors, school counselor educators, and school administrators.
If trained properly, the school counselor is best suited to lead these changes in order to facilitate a climate of safety and support for these students, who are deserving of an equal opportunity to learn.
Alternative "stages," which the author believes are appropriate in tracing the history of the school counselor movement, are presented as an example of this approach.
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