Scholander

Scho·lan·der

(shō'lan-dĕr),
Per F., Norwegian physiologist, 1905-1980. See: Scholander apparatus, Roughton-Scholander apparatus, Roughton-Scholander syringe.
References in periodicals archive ?
1955; Scholander, 1968; Pollak & Waisel, 1970; Joshi et al.
Then in 1962, Per Scholander, a Swedish-born researcher working in the United States, examined the effect of water on humans.
Next, Scholander told the volunteers to hold their breath, dive down, and do a short, vigorous workout.
According to EcoLights' Swedish founders Patrik Eahman, Christer Petersson, Patrik Hedkvist and Greger Scholander, the new bulbs have all the benefits of modern incandescent bulbs, including: 360 degree light projection, instant switch-on, are fully dimmable, aesthetically pleasing and available in a variety of shapes, sizes and glass renderings.
The leaf water potential ([PSI]w) was obtained using the Scholander pressure chamber (PMS-1000, EUA).
Water potentials of leaves were determining using pressure chamber method and recommendations of Scholander et al.
The method was pioneered by Dixon at the beginning of the 20th century [6] and introduced into widespread practice by Scholander and coworkers [76].
Water status of each Coleogyne seedling was determined using a portable pressure chamber (Plant Moisture Stress Instrument Company; Covallis, OR) as described by Scholander et al.
An old fluoroscopy table, a new Electronics for Medicine recorder (otherwise known as the Scheiner machine), a couple of Van Slykes, a Tissot, a couple of Douglas bags for oxygen collection, a Scholander apparatus, a Collins spirometer, a Sanborn Twin-Beam phonocardiogram, an earpiece oximeter, a few Cournand and Goodale-Lubin catheters, and pressure strain gauges were all very exciting to the young physician.
Scholander equipment was purchased so that the oxygen content of expired air could be measured in order to do Fick cardiac output determinations.
Jeschke and others (1995) determined that high atmospheric pressures from a Scholander pressure chamber were needed to remove sap from Atriplex hortensis L.
Leaf water potential, measured with a Scholander bomb (Scholander et al.