schizotypal

(redirected from Schizotype)
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schizotypal

/schizo·ty·pal/ (skit″so-ti´p'l) exhibiting abnormalities in behavior and communication style similar to those of schizophrenia, but less severe. See under personality.
References in periodicals archive ?
One study investigated the association of MPAs and neurological soft signs with schizotype in first degree relatives (11).
Benign schizotypy: Investigating differences between clusters of schizotype on paranormal belief, creativity, intelligence and mental health.
Holt, Simmonds-Moore, and Moore (2008) described a type of schizotypes known as "happy schizotypes," who tend to have good mental health (although notas good as those who are low in all forms of schizotypy), a belief in the "paranormal," and high scores on creativity measures.
As such they often are called "happy schizotypes," although the expression "schizotypy" may be a misnomer considering the apparent healthy status of such individuals (Claridge, 1997).
Claridge, who carried out the pioneer work on "positive" or "happy" schizotypes, joint-authored a paper reporting that the schizotypy measure correlated with distressful nightmares (Claridge, Clark, & Davis, 1997).
He describes what schizotypic psychopathology is, how to recognize it, and its use for explaining schizophrenia, showing that the disorder begins before the emergence of symptoms and that studying schizotypes provides opportunity for examining risk in nonpsychotic individuals.
The hypothesis was that the high schizotypes would have early visual deficits (P1 component reduction) and working memory similar to that observed in persons with schizophrenia and their first-degree relatives.
However, the performance on the task was significantly worse in the high schizotypes, as they identified correctly a lower number of target cues (P = .
Benign schizotypy: Investigating differences between clusters of schizotypes on paranormal belief, creativity, intelligence and mental health.
The "low schizotypy" cluster (corresponding to the high Unusual Experiences cluster from the previous study) scored significantly higher than the other two clusters on the Sense of Coherence scale, suggesting that this cluster consisted of "healthy schizotypes.