Scheuermann


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Scheu·er·mann

(shoy'ĕr-mahn),
Holger W., Danish surgeon, 1877-1960. See: Scheuermann disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ignacio Jofre, (1) Cesar Pezoa, (1) Magdalena Cuevas, (1) Erick Scheuermann, (2) Irlan Almeida Freires, (3) Pedro Luiz Rosalen, (3) Severino Matias de Alencar, (4) and Fernando Romero (1)
Scheuermann, who says that in her dreams she is not disabled, underwent brain surgery in 2012 after seeing a video of another paralyzed patient controlling a robotic arm with his thoughts.
Scheuermann, Reading Jane Austen (New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2009), 134.
Scheuermann, who sided with the study committee, says she thinks taxing cloud-based services "sends the wrong message to providers and clients," and undermines Vermont's efforts to nurture and expand its technology sector.
A talented visual artist, author, and translator, Julia Virginia Scheuermann was born in Frankfurt am Main on 1 April 1878, and reportedly died on 23 April 1942.
Birmingham artist Michael Scheuermann has been working with local students (top left) on the sculpture which will be winched into a Midland village
Scheuermann, "CATIS: A Context-Aware Tourist Information System", International workshop of mobile computing, 2003.
Asi pues, la mayoria de estudios en donde se trata de obtener el grado de implantacion de las TIC en los centros educativos incluyen un apartado referido a las actitudes del profesorado (Cabero, 1991; Castano, 1994; Rodriguez Mondejar, 2000; Van Braak, 2001; Barajas, Scheuermann y And Kikis, 2002; Orellana et al.
Speaker: Michael Scheuermann, Associate Vice President Instructional Technology Support, Drexel University
With more than 20,000 students, Drexel University relies on distance learning, online, and hybrid classes, according to Michael Scheuermann of Drexel.
Richard Scheuermann, from the University of Texas, said:
We hypothesize that older people are somewhat protected because the epitopes present in flu strains before 1957 may be similar to those found in the current H1N1 strain, or at least similar enough that the immune system of the previously infected person recognizes the pathogen and knows to attack," surmises Richard Scheuermann, professor of pathology and clinical sciences.