satellite

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Related to Satellites: Communication satellites, Artificial satellites

satellite

 [sat´ĕ-līt]
1. in genetics, a knob of chromatin connected by a stalk to the short arm of certain chromosomes.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a large one.
3. a vein that closely accompanies an artery.
4. exhibiting satellitism.
5. satellite clinic.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt),
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one; for example, a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
See also: primite.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
See also: primite.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]

satellite

/sat·el·lite/ (sat´ĕ-līt″)
1. a vein that closely accompanies an artery, such as the brachial.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a larger one.
3. a globoid mass of chromatin attached at the secondary constriction to the ends of the short arms of acrocentric autosomes.
4. exhibiting satellitism.

satellite

(săt′l-īt′)
n.
1. Genetics A short segment of a chromosome separated from the rest by a constriction, typically associated with the formation of a nucleolus.
2. Microbiology A colony of microorganisms whose growth in culture medium is enhanced by certain substances produced by another colony in its proximity.
Referring to one or more lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point and have the same pathogenesis and appearance

satellite

adjective Referring to lesions, masses, patterns or radiologic densities that surround a central point. See Minisatellite.

sat·el·lite

(sat'ĕ-līt)
1. A minor structure accompanying a more important or larger one, e.g., a vein accompanying an artery, or a small or secondary lesion adjacent to a larger one.
2. The posterior member of a pair of gregarine gamonts in syzygy, several of which may be found in some species.
[L. satelles (sattelit-), attendant]

satellite

1. in genetics, a knob of chromatin connected by a stalk to the short arm of certain chromosomes.
2. a minor, or attendant, lesion situated near a large one.
3. a vein that closely accompanies an artery.
4. exhibiting satellitism.

satellite cell
cells present in nervous and muscle tissue, whose numbers diminish with age, which are involved in repair when damage occurs. They are capable of migration, reorientation, can proliferate, form myoblasts and myotubes, and form long cytoplasmic tails that act as tethers when they migrate.
satellite DNA
References in periodicals archive ?
As of last month, 2,556 satellites of all kinds - military, scientific and commercial - were soaring hundreds of miles above Earth, according to NASA and the Air Force.
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