Sartwell

Sart·well

(sart'wel),
Philip, U.S. epidemiologist, 1908-1999. See: Sartwell incubation model.
References in periodicals archive ?
php; Sartwell Crispin, "Combat Rock," review of American Hardcore: A Tribal History, in Los Angeles Times, 1 September 2002.
While nowhere near the first to note the connections between art and politics, Sartwell (art and art history, Dickinson College) makes the strong argument that all political ideologies are in fact aesthetic systems, "that the aesthetic expressions of a regime or of the resistance to a regime are central also to the cognitive content and concrete effects of political systems.
3) According to philosopher Crispin Sartwell, interviewed on American Philosopher, a documentary by Philip McReynolds, http://www.
Despite the objections of Voltairine's mother, her father, an atheist and admirer of Voltaire, created her distinctive given name to commemorate his own beliefs (Avrich 1978, 19; Havel [1914] 2005, 7; Palczewski 1955, 54; Sartwell 2005, 4).
Crispin Sartwell notes that "the [white] oppressor seeks to constrain the oppressed [blacks] to certain approved modes of visibility (those set out in the template of stereotype) and then gazes obsessively on the spectacle he has created" (Sartwell 11).
I have employees waiting in line to use the tool," said Al Sartwell, cleaning room supervisor.
Matt Sartwell, who manages the store, adds, "Because it's such a simple dessert, but with so many variations, my sense is that anyplace that there is a fresh dairy culture, there is a fresh cheese that is served in one way or another, in both savory and sweet iterations.
The workshops acknowledge that Aboriginal youth are affected by politics and race, and as Crispin Sartwell (1998:160) wrote about African American hip hop and its encounter with racism in the United States, the best way to deal with race is not to ignore it, but to articulate it: 'It must first be made visible .
Carex lupuliformis Sartwell ex Dewey, hop-like caric-sedge, 2129
Many would agree, but Crispin Sartwell and Stephen Maitzen argue that Alston's claim has surprising implications.
Crispin Sartwell writes: "The program of critical formalism .
Professor Crispin Sartwell has devised a mathematical formula to measure how good bands are and he reckons the Stones score higher than the Beatles because they stuck to their Blues roots.