Sarcoptes scabiei


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Sar·cop·tes sca·bie·i

(sar-kop'tēz skā'bē-ī),
Formerly Acarus scabiei, the itch mite, varieties of which are distributed worldwide and affect humans, horses, cattle, swine, sheep, dogs, cats, and many wild animals; serious and fatal infections are not uncommon in untreated animals. Although considered to belong to a single species, they do not readily pass from one host to another of a different animal species; transitory infections of this type do occur, however, especially from various animals to humans, and are spread by direct contact. The mite burrows into the skin and lays eggs within the burrow; intense itching and rash develop near the burrow in about a month. See: scabies, mange.
[sarco- + G. koptō, to cut; L. scabies, scurf]

Sarcoptes scabiei

[särkop′tēz skā′bē·ī]
Etymology: Gk, sarx + koptein, to cut; L, scabere, to scratch
the genus of itch mite that causes scabies. See also Norwegian scabies.

Sarcoptes scabiei

Itch mite The globally distributed arthropod responsible for crusted scabies; its modus operandi is to burrow serpiginous subcutaneous tracks, laying eggs and evoking pruritus. See Crusted scabies, Scabies.

Sar·cop·tes sca·bi·ei

(sahr-kop'tēz skā'bē-ī)
The itch mite, varieties of which are distributed worldwide and affect humans and many animals. The mite burrows into the skin and lays eggs within the burrow; intense itching and rash develop near the burrow in about a month.
See also: scabies, mange
[sarco- + G. koptō, to cut; L. scabies, scurf]
References in periodicals archive ?
OConnor explained that the mite responsible for the extreme hair loss seen in "chupacabras syndrome" is Sarcoptes scabiei, which also causes the itchy rash known as scabies in people.
Typically, the scabies mite, called Sarcoptes scabiei, causes an itchy rash often between the fingers which is treatable with a lotion.
Sarcoptes scabiei (sarcoptic mange or scabies) was prevalent in coyotes in Cimarron County during our study (R.
zeylanicum oil could represent a possible alternative for the topical treatment of psoroptic mange in rabbits and encourage further studies to evaluate its efficacy also on other mange mites responsible for otoacariasis, such as Otodectes cynotis, or skin diseases, such as Sarcoptes scabiei, in other animal species and in humans (Arlian, 1996; Wrenn, 1996).
ASCABIES is a skin infection by a small mite, sarcoptes scabiei, which burrows into the skin.
AScabies is an itchy rash caused by the infestation of the skin with a parasite called Sarcoptes scabiei, which is transmitted by skin-to-skin contact with an infected person, eg holding hands, hugging or having sex.
Infectious causes include Candida albicans, dermatophytes, Staphylococcus aureus, Corynebacterium minutissimum (erythrasma), group A [beta]-hemolytic Streptococcus, human Papillomavirus, herpes simplex, Enterobius vermicularis, and Sarcoptes scabiei.
According to Ray, per the the New England Journal of Medicine, Ivermectin is an anthelmintic agent that has been a safe, effective treatment for onchocerciasis (river blindness) and for infestation of the mite Sarcoptes scabiei (scabies).
Scabies is a skin infestation with a tiny mite, Sarcoptes scabiei.
SCIENTIFIC NAME: Sarcoptes scabiei (sar-KOP-tis SCAY-be-eye)
Bacteria * Chlamydia trachomatis * Neisseria gonorrhoeae * Treponema pallidum * Haemophilus ducreyi * Calymmatobactenum granulomatosis * Mycoplasma hominis * Mycoplasma genitalum * Ureaplasma urealyticum Viruses * Human immunodeficiency virus * Herpes simplex virus types I and II * Human papilloma viruses * Hepatitis B virus * Hepatitis C virus * Molluscum contagiousum Virus Protozoa * Trichomonas vaginalis Ectoparasites * Sarcoptes scabiei * Phthirus pubis