Bernhardt

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Bern·hardt

(bern'hart),
Martin, German neurologist, 1844-1915. See: Bernhardt disease, Bernhardt-Roth syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
The French actress Sarah Bernhardt was an internationally acclaimed star of the nineteenth-century stage, but she is largely unknown by twenty-first century audiences.
Bernhardt's image was also used to market more prosaic products from cosmetics to boeuf bouillion, as evidenced in Cheret's poster for Le Diaphane, Poudre de riz Sarah Bernhardt (1890), and anonymous trading cards advertising Extrait de viande, featuring Bernhardt as L'Aiglon (1900), reminding us that branding has a long history.
His works range from small, intimate sketches of friends and relatives to large, three-dimensional depictions of such cultural icons as Sarah Bernhardt, Pablo Picasso, Mae West, Jackson Pollock, Gertrude Stein, and Elvis Presley.
To mention only a few of the illustrations that adorn this volume: a full-page photograph of Vivien Leigh as Lavinia in Brook's 1955 production of Titus; Peggy Ashcroft as Desdemona and Paul Robeson as Othello in the Savoy Theatre's 1930 production; Sarah Bernhardt as Hamlet in 1904; Dorothy Tutin as Cressida in the Barton/Hall Troilus and Cressida of 1960.
Several bits of meat included here would be known even without Proust's jelly: Sarah Bernhardt (who inspired La Berma), Monet (Elstir), Faure (Vinteuil), Anatole France (Bergotte).
Henry, Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Sarah Bernhardt, Virgil Thompson, Jackson Pollack, Bob Dylan and many, many others.
In The Divine Sarah: The Life of Sarah Bernhardt (New York: Knopf, 1991), Arthur Gold and Robert Fizdale provide an explanation for the great Sarah Bernhardt's hold over her public, an explanation that provides insight into Callas's charisma as well:
Coincidentally, Sarah Bernhardt and her theatrical troupe arrive for a protracted engagement, and, learning of imperial concern, the diva beseeches far-off Sherlock Holmes, along with Dr.
It is a cold December afternoon in Paris and the Sarah Bernhardt cafe is full of chilled protesters, fresh from the demonstration "pour la democracie en Algerie".
Ninety percent of the furnishings and works of art are original to the hotel where notable personalities of that age, such as Anna Pavlova, Sarah Bernhardt, and Theodore Roosevelt, were among the guests.
As for storytelling ability, check out his riveting account of a reclusive Brazilian plantation owner who worships France and Sarah Bernhardt and thinks he has discovered a new constellation which traces the outline of the Eiffel Tower.