saprophyte

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saprophyte

 [sap´ro-fīt]
any organism, such as a bacterium or protozoon, living upon dead or decaying organic matter. For fungi, the preferred term is saprobe. adj., adj saprophyt´ic.

sap·ro·phyte

(sap'rō-fīt),
An organism that grows on dead organic matter, plant or animal. See: saprobe.
Synonym(s): necroparasite
[sapro- + G. phyton, plant]

saprophyte

/sap·ro·phyte/ (sap´ro-fīt) any organism living upon dead or decaying organic matter. For fungi, the preferred term is saprobe. saprophyt´ic

saprophyte

(săp′rə-fīt′)
n.
An organism, especially a fungus or bacterium, that derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter. Also called saprobe.

sap′ro·phyt′ic (-fĭt′ĭk) adj.
sap′ro·phyt′i·cal·ly adv.

saprophyte

[sap′rəfīt]
Etymology: Gk, sapros, rotten, phyton, plant
an organism that lives on dead organic matter. saprophytic, adj.

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]

saprophyte

An organism that lives on and derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter.

saprophyte

or

saprotroph

any plant or microorganism that obtains its nutrition from dead or decaying organic materials in the form of organic substances in solution. Such organisms are of great importance in breaking down dead organic material. see NITROGEN CYCLE.

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]

saprophyte,

n an organism that lives on dead organic matter.

saprophyte

any organism, such as a bacterium, capable of living in inanimate media.
References in periodicals archive ?
S epidermidis is almost universally regarded as a saprophyte and a probable contaminant of middle ear cultures.
However, in this study, none of these species was isolated from living standing jack pine trees, which indicates that none of these fungi are saprophytes associated with healthy living trees.
The identified fungi are common (Tables 2 and 3), known saprophytes or plant pathogens.
More than 150 species have been described to date, but most are believed to be harmless saprophytes (1).
They are saprophytes commonly found in soil, decomposed vegetation, and in the healthy human respiratory and digestive tracts, and their distribution is worldwide.
P boydii and its asexual form, Scedosporium apiospermum are ubiquitous saprophytes in polluted streams and decaying vegetation.
Both M avium and M intracellulare are environmental saprophytes that survive well in soil, water, and food; the organisms are carried by animals as well.
The microbial activity and abundance is affected by (1) reducing the amount and diversity of litter input; (2) decreasing population size, species composition, and diversity of saprophytes and detritivores; and (3) reducing the time interval between litter inputs, and changing the site of decomposition from the soil surface to within the soil.
But dogwood struggles to grow here, chiefly due to its susceptibility to more than 50 kinds of fungi, be they saprophytes of leaf, stem or root.