saprophyte

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saprophyte

 [sap´ro-fīt]
any organism, such as a bacterium or protozoon, living upon dead or decaying organic matter. For fungi, the preferred term is saprobe. adj., adj saprophyt´ic.

sap·ro·phyte

(sap'rō-fīt),
An organism that grows on dead organic matter, plant or animal. See: saprobe.
Synonym(s): necroparasite
[sapro- + G. phyton, plant]

saprophyte

/sap·ro·phyte/ (sap´ro-fīt) any organism living upon dead or decaying organic matter. For fungi, the preferred term is saprobe. saprophyt´ic

saprophyte

(săp′rə-fīt′)
n.
An organism, especially a fungus or bacterium, that derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter. Also called saprobe.

sap′ro·phyt′ic (-fĭt′ĭk) adj.
sap′ro·phyt′i·cal·ly adv.

saprophyte

[sap′rəfīt]
Etymology: Gk, sapros, rotten, phyton, plant
an organism that lives on dead organic matter. saprophytic, adj.

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]

saprophyte

An organism that lives on and derives its nourishment from dead or decaying organic matter.

saprophyte

or

saprotroph

any plant or microorganism that obtains its nutrition from dead or decaying organic materials in the form of organic substances in solution. Such organisms are of great importance in breaking down dead organic material. see NITROGEN CYCLE.

sap·robe

(sap'rōb)
An organism that lives on dead organic material. usage note This term is preferable to saprophyte, because bacteria and fungi are no longer regarded as plants.
[sapro- + G. bios, life]

saprophyte,

n an organism that lives on dead organic matter.

saprophyte

any organism, such as a bacterium, capable of living in inanimate media.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, the use of other techniques favored and accelerated the growth of saprophyte fungi such as Rhizopus, Fusarium, Phoma, Aspergillus and Penicillium, since they are facultative saprophytic microorganisms.
The use of total coliform and fecal coliform bacteria did not make the contribution of storm water apparent because some coliform organisms are saprophytes and can bloom in higher water temperatures without being linked to a pollution source (Greenberg, Clesceri, & Eaton, 1992).
Environmental mycobacteria also referred to as atypical mycobacteria or non tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are common saprophytes in all natural ecosystems, such as water, soil, food and dust (1-3).
A variety of nonpathogenic saprophytes were cultured from both water and bottle stoppers.
Saprophytes are organisms that use dead organic matter to obtain their nutrients when a susceptible host is not present or environmental conditions are unfavorable.
Another important group in human and veterinary medicine consists of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), these being opportunistic saprophytes causing mycobacteriosis in animals (Table 1) (3-6).
Dematiaceous hyphomycetes are a large, heterogenous group of fungi which inhabiting the environments around the world as soil saprophytes and plant pathogens [2].
They are first and foremost saprophytes, (organisms that thrive on decaying organic matter).
Some fungi are saprophytes (feeding on dead or decaying material) and some fungi are parasitic (feeding on living organisms without killing them).
Microbacterium spp are generally believed to be normal saprophytes of the external auditory canal, although one study showed that they were present in 9.
Albaconazole, the newest triazole, is still in an early developmental stage, but "it is better than itraconazole, fluconazole, or voriconazole for almost all of the common dermatophytes and saprophytes, and at least as good as or better than all the existing triazoles," Dr.
are ubiquitous fungi that are soil saprophytes and plant pathogens.