Sapir-Whorf hypothesis


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Sapir-Whorf hypothesis

(sə-pîr′wôrf′, -hwôrf′)
n.
A hypothesis holding that the structure of a language affects the perceptions of reality of its speakers and thus influences their thought patterns and worldviews.
References in periodicals archive ?
This book reads easily but, at times, it gets repetitive in its dismissal of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.
On the other hand, Whorf's contribution to what has come to be called the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis does not reflect the caution of Sapir.
To understand the way in which metaphorical frames guide our thinking, it is helpful first to consider a contrasting model, the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.
As the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis implies, a new way of thinking requires a new language.
The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis has led to two interpretations a weaker form of linguistic relativism ("language influences thinking") and the stronger linguistic determinism ("language determines thinking").
In its weaker form, the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis argues that language "shapes" perception.
I found myself engaged in a debate reminiscent of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis about language: Does it reflect or create (perceptions of) social reality?
In this context, the book should have included the classic Sapir-Whorf hypothesis (see Sapir 1949; and Whorf 1956) which maintains, at least in its weak version, that culture frames language and language frames culture.
As Gumperz and Levinson note in their introduction to this part, such an extension of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis implies a new view of linguistic relativity, one that goes beyond the lexical and grammatical categories traditionally considered in previous studies and includes indexicals as the possible locus of some forms of linguistic relativity, not previously considered by Sapir and Whorf in their writings.
The new paper examines a series of experiments on recognition-memory for colors, often thought to support the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.
The foregoing views accord with what is referred to as the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, the belief that language may influence thought and behaviour (see, e.
A cross-cultural study of English and Setswana speakers on a colour-triads task: A test of the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis.