Santería

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Santería

A combination of Catholicism and ancient African magic, similar to voodoo, which is based on the worship of saints or Santeria. Believers visit Santerían spiritual healers for medical help—e.g., to cure dread diseases such as cancer. All Santerían priests and priestesses are herbalists who used plants as both remedies and for their “magic”.
References in periodicals archive ?
The chants became more complex when two female vocalists joined in on the suite's second movement, dedicated to the female deities in Santeria, also known as Regla de Ocha.
She expressed regret that her mother never explained the practices she was exposed to as a little girl at "Dofia Anna's" storefront church of Santeria in El Barrio (Spanish Harlem, New York City, where Maria grew up).
Shedding light on the extraordinary global growth of this religion over the past 50 years, Lele's 256-page guide to the sacrificial ceremonies of Santeria enables initiates to learn proper ceremony protocol; it also gives outsiders a glimpse into this most secretive world.
Now when I teach my courses and talk about these cases, I have all these details in my head--the machete by the door in the home of a Santeria priest, the animatronic dinosaurs at the Creation Museum outside Cincinnati--that will hopefully help me bring the cases to life for my students and anyone else who wants to listen to me.
That law was ostensibly a public health measure, but the court decided it violated the First Amendment because it singled out religious slaughter and was passed in response to the establishment of a Santeria church.
She mentions Papa Colas, a well-known santeria priest of late 18th-century Havana who "was a famous invertido married to another invertido .
In The Old Man and the Sea, Hemingway was profoundly affected by the Afro-Cuban religion of Santeria and sympathetic to the idea that the sea was protected by saints and orishas.
NG's first album, En la calle (On the street), contained critical references to such issues as prostitution and racism, and mentioned Santeria, money problems, and other familiar aspects of quotidian life in the barrio.
Mary Ann Clark Where Men Are Wives and Mothers Rule: Santeria Ritual Practices and Their Gender Implications Gainesville, Florida: University Press of Florida, 2005, xii + 185 pp.
Particularly pressing is her compilation of Afro-Cuban lore, El monte: igbo finda, ewe orisha, vititi nfinda (1954), a compendium of religious practice, gods, folkways, and ethnobotany, and a key text (perhaps the key text) in the santeria canon.
We traveled freely throughout the country, attended worship services with Catholics, Pentecostals, Baptists and Santeria followers.
Reinerio Arce, principal of the Evangelical Seminary of Theology in Matanzas, said in your story that a majority of Cubans are followers of Santeria, an Afro-Caribbean religion.