Thomsonianism

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Thomsonianism

Naturopathy
A healthcare movement founded by Samuel Thomson, which was an early form of naturopathy popular in the US in the early 1800s. Thomsonians were at variance with the physicians of the day who, in the pre-germ-theory period of medicine, relied on bleeding, blistering and purging to treat patients.
References in periodicals archive ?
SRINIVAS GOVINDARAJULU *, VIVEK LAL *, SAMUEL THOMSON SUGUMARAN DAVIDSON *, THIRUMUGAM MUTHUVEL *, SHIBU GEORGE * & KANAGASABAPATHY VAIKUNDANATHAN *
The Correspondence of Samuel Thomson (1766-1816) (Dublin: Four Court Press, 2012), p.
70) Other major Romantic-era exponents of Ulster-Scots cotter, or cottier, poems include Samuel Thomson, Sarah Leech, Robert Huddleston and David Herbison.
JENNIFER ORR'S edition of the correspondence received by Ulster poet Samuel Thomson between 1791 and his death in 1816 is an important contribution to the ongoing revision of our understanding of Irish and Scottish literary and cultural history and of the Romantic period.
The edition includes 96 Letters organized by author, with the earliest letter from each of his 27 correspondents determining the 1791-1815 chronology, and a "Miscellany in Samuel Thomson's own hand" in which Orr transcribes notes and almost 50 poems by Thomson and others in the Samuel Thomson manuscripts at Trinity College, Dublin.
Samuel Thomson, a rural schoolmaster who lived in a humble cottage eighteen miles north of Belfast, was a well-educated "Rhyming Weaver" who wrote over two hundred poems in both Scots and, more and more, vernacular English-language verse.
Providing a window into the literary life of Ulster in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, this collection of the correspondence of radical Presbyterian Scots-vernacular poet Samuel Thomson allows students of romantic poetry and literature a glimpse at the emerging world of Northern arts during a controversial period in Irish history.
The Correspondence of Samuel Thomson (1766-1816), edited by Jennifer Orr, contains no letters in Thomson's own hand but rather consists of letters addressed to Thomson at his home in Crambo Cave, near Templepatrick in County Antrim.
The Correspondence of Samuel Thomson demonstrates the importance of publishing archival correspondence and these letters demand a fuller literary examination in order to thoroughly comprehend the significance of Thomson, his literary coterie and the development of Ulster Scots literature; Jennifer Orr has enabled this analysis to now take place.