salivary gland

(redirected from Salivary gland diseases)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Salivary gland diseases: salivary gland cancer, Stomach diseases

sal·i·var·y gland

[TA]
any of the saliva-secreting exocrine glands of the oral cavity.
See also: major salivary glands, minor salivary glands.
Synonym(s): glandula salivaria [TA]

salivary gland

n.
A gland that secretes saliva, especially any of three pairs of glands, the parotid, submaxillary, and sublingual, that discharge secretions into the oral cavity of humans and most other mammals.

salivary gland

any one of three pairs of glands secreting into the mouth, thus aiding the digestive process. The salivary glands are the parotid, the submandibular, and the sublingual. They are racemose structures consisting of numerous lobes subdivided into smaller lobules connected by dense areolar tissue, vessels, and ducts. The sublingual gland secretes mucus; the parotid gland, serous fluid; and the submandibular gland, both mucus and serous fluid. The lobules of the salivary glands are richly supplied with blood vessels and fine plexuses of nerves. The hilum of the submandibular gland contains Langley's ganglion of nerve cells.
enlarge picture
Salivary glands

sal·i·var·y gland

(sal'i-var-ē gland) [TA]
Any of the saliva-secreting exocrine glands of the oral cavity.
Enlarge picture
SALIVARY GLANDS

salivary gland

Any of the glands near the oral cavity that secrete saliva. The major glands are paired and include the parotid, the sublingual, and the submandibular. There are numerous minor salivary glands in the oral cavity, named according to their locations: lingual, sublingual, palatal, buccal, labial, and glossopharyngeal. See: illustration

Salivary secretion is under nervous control, reflexly initiated by mechanical, chemical, or radiant stimuli acting on taste buds in the mouth, olfactory receptors, or the eyes. Secretion may also be due to conditioned reflexes as when one thinks about food or hears a dinner bell. The nerve supply of the salivary glands is from the facial and glossopharyngeal nerves, which increase secretion, and from the sympathetic nerves, which decrease secretion. The blood supply is from branches of the external carotid artery.

See also: gland

salivary gland

any gland that secretes SALIVA.

Salivary gland

Three pairs of glands that secrete into the mouth and aid digestion.
Mentioned in: Dry Mouth, Parotidectomy

sal·i·var·y gland

(sal'i-var-ē gland) [TA]
Any of the saliva-secreting exocrine glands of oral cavity.
See also: major salivary glands, minor salivary glands

salivary gland

any of the glands around the mouth that secrete saliva. The major ones are the three pairs known as the parotid, mandibular or submandibular and sublingual glands. There are other smaller salivary glands within the cheeks, e.g. zygomatic gland, and in the tongue.
Enlarge picture
Salivary glands in the dog. By permission from Aspinall V, O'Reilly M, Introduction to Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology, Butterworth Heinemann, 2004

salivary gland inflammation
see sialoadenitis, parotiditis.
salivary gland squamous metaplasia
of the interlobular duct of the salivary gland is a feature of hypovitaminosis A.
References in periodicals archive ?
Initially, Cook Medical OHNS will focus on products that are used to treat salivary gland disease, chronic sinusitis, vocal cord paralysis and obstructive sleep apnea, as well as products used for soft-tissue repair and in interventional airway and esophageal procedures.
1] Oral candidiasis, aphthous-like ulcerations, periodontal infections, salivary gland diseases, various malignancies and numerous viral opportunistic infections have been described in the oral cavity of HIV-infected patients.
This atlas provides a comprehensive outline of all but the very rarest salivary gland diseases, detailing the most common benign and malignant tumors with their radiological, cytopathological, and histological features.