sacrotuberous ligament

(redirected from Sacrotuberous)

sa·cro·tu·ber·ous lig·a·ment

[TA]
the ligament that passes from the ischial tuberosity to the ilium, sacrum, and coccyx, transforming the sciatic notch to a large sciatic foramen, which is then further subdivided by the sacrospinous ligament.

sa·cro·tu·ber·ous lig·a·ment

(sā'krō-tū'bĕr-ŭs lig'ă-mĕnt) [TA]
The ligament that passes from the ischial tuberosity to the ilium, sacrum, and coccyx, transforming the sciatic notch to a large sciatic foramen, which is then further subdivided by the sacrospinous ligament.

sacrotuberous ligament

The ligament extending from the tuberosity of the ischium to the posterior superior and inferior iliac spines and to the lower part of the sacrum and coccyx.
See also: ligament

sacrotuberous ligament

see Table 12.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gluteal pain was reproduced with palpation of the sacrotuberous ligaments bilaterally, and digital pressure over the L4 and L5 vertebral segments during prone examination.
The boundaries of the perineum are the pelvic floor superiorly, pubic symphysis anteriorly, coccyx posteriorly, ischial tuberosities laterally, ischiopubic rami anterolaterally, sacrotuberous ligaments posterolaterally, and fascia and skin inferiorly.
1) Pudendal nerve can be compressed when it passes between sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments or within the Alcock canal.
One patient was found preoperatively to have sacrotuberous ligament involvement, and another had total sacral involvement.
With a similar mechanism to APC-1 injuries, APC-2 injuries lie farther along the spectrum of soft tissue injury, with disruption of the anterior SI ligaments as well as the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments.
Ligaments of the pelvis are sacrospinous, sacrotuberous, and anterior longitudinal ligament of the sacrum and they contribute to the stability of the bony pelvis.
A recently described alternative open technique consists of a transgluteal approach, which allows access to the pudendal nerve between the sacrospinous and the sacrotuberous ligaments (Fig.
The iliolumbar ligament is one of three vertebral-pelvic ligaments responsible for stabilizing the lumbrosacral spine in the pelvis, along with the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments.
These injuries are rotationally unstable, there may also be some vertical displacement but this is limited by the sacrotuberous and sacrospinous ligaments, which typically remain intact (1,2).
The nerve runs between the sacrospinous and sacrotuberous ligaments, for instance, and entrapment between these two ligaments is probably the most common cause of pudendal neuralgia.
The long and short posterior sacroiliac ligaments, the interosseous ligaments within the sacroiliac joints and the sacrotuberous ligaments all resist forces leading to vertical translation between the ilia and the sacrum.