sacrifice

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sacrifice

(sak′rĭ-fīs″) [L. sacrificare, to make or offer a sacrifice]
1. To give up or yield something of value.
2. To experience a loss.
References in periodicals archive ?
Through the various sacrificial offerings, it is gradually separated from the corpse and carefully guided south to Puya ('the village of the shadows'), where it is thought to arrive by the end of the mortuary rites.
Lowry claims that his job was trying to unmask republican agents, that he was prevented from getting republican "skulls", that MI5 wants greater control of Special Branch and that Sinn Fein wanted a Special Branch sacrificial offering and he was it.
As the correspondence regarding the case grew, it became clear the FA had decided to use me as a sacrificial offering in their anti-racism campaign.
In all likelihood, Botha will prove a sacrificial offering for the baying spooks who slavishly sponsor Tyson's ego.
Camels -- slaughtered for their meat and skin -- are also being killed as part of sacrificial offerings and illegally transported to other states for slaughter.
The practice of sacrificial offerings first began in the Old Testament when the Jewish people were required by God to offer up unblemished animals to God.
Koziol puts forth evidence for the human sacrificial offerings at Cahokia's Mound 72 and also observes how mortuary practices reflect social relationships.
For instance, the requirement that sacrificial offerings be flavorless (discussed in chapter three) would seem to reflect a more general imperative to restraint and harmony that applies equally to music, dance, and the comportment of the ritual participants.
Interestingly enough, during Temple times there were sacrificial offerings made each day upon the alter and during the week of Sukkot a total of 70 oxen were offered.
In Celtic mythology, the god of sky and thunder - to whom human sacrificial offerings were said to have been made - is usually represented as a bearded man with a thunderbolt in one hand and a wheel in the other.
Sacred objects and sacrificial offerings were thrown into underground cenotes, or pools, for example, at Chichen Itza.
has been involved in a millennial struggle with his thanatotic counterpart and so is regularly supplied by the natives with nubile virgins as sacrificial offerings, this despite the fact that K.