single photon emission computed tomography

(redirected from SPECT scan)

sin·gle pho·ton e·mis·sion com·put·ed to·mog·ra·phy (SPECT),

tomographic imaging of metabolic and physiologic functions in tissues, the image being formed by computer synthesis of photons of a single energy emitted by radionuclides administered in suitable form to the patient.

sin·gle pho·ton e·mis·sion com·put·ed to·mog·ra·phy

(SPECT) (sing'gĕl fō'ton ē-mi'shŭn kŏm-pyūt'ĕd tŏ-mog'ră-fē)
Tomographic imaging of metabolic and physiologic functions in tissues, the image being formed by computer synthesis of photons of a single energy emitted by radionuclides administered in suitable form to the patient.

single photon emission computed tomography

Abbreviation: SPET, SPECT
A medical imaging method for reconstructing sectional images of radiotracer distributions.
See: nuclear medicine scanning test; positron emission tomography
See also: tomography
References in periodicals archive ?
A baseline SPECT scan of dopamine transporter function was performed with the radiopharmaceutical I-123 FP-CIT as an imaging agent.
Inter-radiologist variation was determined by comparing the two radiologists' interpretation of each SPECT scan.
to schedule a SPECT scan to determine if brain scan abnormalities were present and if so to what degree.
The risk for hard cardiac events (death or non-fatal myocardial infarction) after a normal myocardial perfusion SPECT scan is low.
On baseline brain SPECT scan prior to zolpidem treatment there was a decreased uptake of [sup.
Furthermore, we investigated the differences between those who were clinically diagnosed as substance abusers (n = 33; 7 female, 26 male) within our patient population versus those who were not (n = 76) and found no significant level of change between the two groups with regards to adding a SPECT scan to the diagnostic workup.
CT technique requires about 80 per cent less radiation than the older gamma camera examination, commonly referred to as a cardiac SPECT scan.
Several articles characterize the brain propagation patterns of the epileptogenic electrocortical discharge and resultant rCBF hyperemia to allow for more accurate localization of the epileptogenic focus in cases where [greater than or equal to]2 cortical areas are seen to be hyperemic on the brain SPECT scan.
A sophisticated imaging technique called the SPECT scan detects heart damage up to 30 hours after blood flow is briefly disrupted.
A Tc SPECT scan demonstrated decreased uptake in the right calcarine cortex.
Patients in the study will receive a SPECT scan with 99mTc-EC-G, and a PET scan (Positron Emission Tomography) with fluorine-18 FluoroDeoxyGlucose (18F-FDG).