SIDS


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sudden infant death syndrome

 (SIDS)
the sudden and unexpected death of an apparently healthy infant, not explained by careful postmortem studies. It typically occurs between birth and age 9 months, with the highest incidence at 3 to 5 months. Called also crib death or cot death because the infant often is found dead in the crib.



The incidence rate for SIDS in the United States is approximately 10,000 per year. After the first week of life it is the leading cause of death in one-year-olds, and is second only to accidents as a cause of death in children under the age of 15 years. The disorder occurs throughout the world, is more common in families in the lower socioeconomic classes, and affects males slightly more than females and non-Caucasians slightly more than Caucasians.

Children most at risk for SIDS are those who are premature, have a history of apnea from hyaline membrane disease or a seizure disorder, or have a family history of SIDS (especially among siblings) with or without a history of apnea.

There are many misconceptions about the cause of SIDS, most of which are likely to cause feelings of guilt or anger that only add to the heartache of parents whose children have died of the disorder. Among these misconceptions are the beliefs that the infant has suffocated under blankets or from aspirated vomitus, or that contraceptive pills, fluoridation, radioactive fallout, and even lack of breast-feeding have somehow contributed to the disorder.

Identification of infants at risk for SIDS includes determining whether the infant is subject to periods of apnea and if so, why. Diagnostic studies include pneumogram, chest x-ray, determination of chemoreceptor status, metabolic assessment, electrocardiogram, and cardiac and apnea monitoring.

Treatment and prevention of SIDS are necessarily aimed at identifying infants at high risk and instituting a program of apnea monitoring and resuscitation. If home monitoring is deemed necessary, the parents are taught how to place the electrodes over the baby's diaphragm, how to operate the monitoring equipment, and the basic maneuvers for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. While home monitoring does create problems and stress for family members, it usually is not required for more than a few months or at most a year. Most parents feel that the security it provides and the knowledge that their child can survive periods of apnea are worth the sacrifices necessary.

Through the efforts of the National Foundation for Sudden Infant Death, guilt and misunderstandings of the parents about the cause of their infant's death are being handled in a more sensitive and comforting way. Recent interest in research into causes of SIDS has resulted from pressure from parents and members of the national organizations concerned with child health and development. In 1974 Congress passed a bill to set up diagnostic centers throughout the country, and the National Institute of Child Health and Development now allocates more than half a million dollars annually for SIDS research. The address of the National SIDS Alliance is 10500 Little Patuxent Pkwy., Columbia MD 21044.

SIDS

SIDS

sudden infant death syndrome.

SIDS

(sĭdz)
abbr.
sudden infant death syndrome

SIDS

abbreviation for sudden infant death syndrome.

SIDS

Crib death Neoinatology Sudden infant death syndrome Definition per 2nd Intl Conf on SIDS, WHO 'Sudden and unexpected death of an infant (generally, from 2 wks to 6 months of age, while sleeping) who was well or almost well before death which remains unexplained after an adequate autopsy' SIDS by ethnicity–US Asian 0.5/1000; white 1.3/1000; black 2.9/1000; Native American 5.9/1000 Risk factors SIDS is ↑ in premature ♂ infants < 6 months old, lower socioeconomics, prior SIDS death with same mother, children of narcotic–heroin, methadone, cocaine–users, smokers, single mothers DiffDx Involuntary smothering by exhausted mother who 'co-sleeps' with infant Pathogenesis Unknown–theories abound Prophylaxis Am Acad Pediatrics recommends placing infants on backs to sleep. Cf Child abuse.

SIDS

Abbreviation for sudden infant death syndrome.

SIDS

Abbrev. for SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME.

SIDS,

n See syndrome, sudden infant death.

SIDS

Abbreviation for sudden infant death syndrome.

SIDS,

n abbreviation for sudden
infant
death
syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
I have to congratulate the authors on doing SIDS research--it's not an easy task," says De-Kun Li, a senior research scientist at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Division of Research, who was not involved in the study.
It is every parents right to know - whatever their personal circumstance or beliefs - the factors that may make SIDS more likely for their precious baby.
We do not suggest that babies should not be brought into the parent's bed for comfort and feeding," they wrote, as those practices do not increase SIDS risk.
Despite this, all SIDS are vulnerable to economic shocks and natural hazards to a degree that few other countries or regions are.
The current findings provide important clues to the biological basis of SIDS and may ultimately lead to ways to identify infants most at risk as well as additional strategies for reducing the risk of SIDS for all infants.
SIDS is the leading cause of death in Canada for infants between the age of one month to one year.
Despite decades of extensive research, our understanding of the causes of sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, remains incomplete, although it's known as a phenomenon of multiple causes.
Mice genetically engineered to overproduce the brain chemical serotonin died at an early age after developing symptoms similar to those of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), suggesting improper regulation of serotonin may cause SIDS in humans.
The only thing that we know about SIDS is that we do not know anything.
SIDS took the lives of about 2,200 babies in the U.
Registered nurse Jill Green calls SIDS and Kids Australia's annual Red Nose Day her "Molly Days" in memory of her daughter Molly Rose who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) in 1996.
State Coroner Nikolas Charalambous said he was "waiting for results from laboratory tests which will confirm the exact cause of death, but yes, the infant suffered SIDS.