base units

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base u·nits

the fundamental units of length, mass, time, electric current, thermodynamic temperature, amount of substance, and luminous intensity in the International System of Units (SI); the names and symbols of the units for these quantities are meter (m), kilogram (kg), second (s), ampere (A), kelvin (K), mole (mol), and candela (cd).
See also: International System of Units.

base units

(bās yū'nits)
The fundamentalmeasurements of length, mass, time, electric current, thermodynamic temperature, amount of substance, and luminous intensity in the International System of Units (SI); the names and symbols of the units for these quantities are meter (m), kilogram (kg), second (s), ampere (A), kelvin (K), mole (mol), and candela (cd).
See also: International System of Units
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, one of the principal motivations for the New SI is the fact that the kilogram is the only SI base unit whose definition is still based on a material artifact.
However, the actual definitions of the current SI base units, second s, meter m, kilogram kg, ampere A, kelvin K, mole mol, and candela cd, are not included in Appendix A, because they are given and used in Secs.
In it, Feller points out the dependence of five of the SI base units on fundamental constants.
The current SI is founded on the seven base quantities, assumed to be independent, time, length, mass, electric current, thermodynamic temperature, amount of substance, and luminous intensity, for which the SI base units are the second s, meter m, kilogram kg, ampere A, kelvin K, mole mol, and candela cd, respectively; see Table 1.
This idea had to be abandoned because the path to an SI base unit adopted by the CGPM was too narrow, considering that there are only seven base units.
A good example of an experiment developed to realize the SI base unit of current is the ampere balance [6].
The kilogram is one of the seven SI base units from which all other units can be derived and is the only one which is measured against a physical object - the IPK - all others are standardised against known constants.
I also took into account the fact that not all of NIST's work can be neatly categorized by SI base units and the measurements associated with them.