SENP2

SENP2

A gene on chromosome 3q27.2 that encodes sentrin-specific peptidase 2, which has two key roles:
(1) Processing of full-length SUMO1, SUMO2 and SUMO3 to mature forms; and
(2) Deconjugating SUMO1, SUMO2 and SUMO3 from targeted proteins.

SENP2 may also downregulate CTNNB1 levels, thereby modulating the Wnt pathway.It is also a less preferred gene symbol for what is now designated as SUMO1, see there.
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References in periodicals archive ?
First author Joshua Bernstock and his colleagues examined whether any of over 4,000 molecules from the NCATS small molecule collections could boost SUMOylation by blocking a SENP called SENP2, which would theoretically protect cells from a shortage of life-sustaining substances.
The researchers first used an automated process to examine whether the compounds prevented SENP2 from severing the connection between a tiny metal bead and an artificial SUMO protein created in the lab of Wei Yang, Ph.
The second, Sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 2, or SENP2, snips SUMO off of proteins (de-SUMOylation).
The researchers held on to this line of research after knocking SENP2 out of mouse DNA and found that the embryos died at about day 10.
In early development, SENP2 works as a switch to turn on Gata4 and Gata6.
When SENP2 is turned on, it peels SUMO off of PRC1, which then falls off the histone, and when that happens, the lock is removed and genes are transcribed," said Yeh.
In short, SUMO helps the PRC1 complex repress genes, and SENP2 reverses this repression, allowing gene transcription and expression.
The researchers have discovered a link between the key placental gene, SENP2 and well-known p53 protein, which is defective in 50 percent of all cancers.
What we discovered was an unexpected interaction between an old player, p53, and a new player, SENP2," said lead author Wei Hsu, Ph.
SENP2 (SUMO-specific protease 2) is highly expressed in trophoblast cells, which are the stem cells required to form the placenta.
While investigating disruption of placental formation in a mouse model, Hsu's team observed that embryos lacking SENP2 failed to properly make placental tissue.
In the further study, researchers set out to find SENP2 target proteins that could be involved in arresting cell growth.