SCOTUS


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SCOTUS

Supreme Court of the United States.
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In the category of "you say it best when you say nothing at all," SCOTUS stayed Watson's 40-page order with an unsigned edict.
Scotus will also identify the intellect's object with the efficient cause of actions, but not absolutely.
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59) Scotus was interested in the objective nature of intellectual knowledge.
Historically, Scotus lived in a challenging time for theologians and philosophers.
The privileged few able to secure tickets to attend the SCOTUS oral arguments in person had to camp out overnight to get them.
It is not only about the redirection of attention from the abstract meanings, extending sharply beyond worldly reality, to the mechanism of signification and, accordingly, to the singular concrete items of nature, because the problem of universals had been a consistent part of Christian theological deliberations from times remote; as we shall see, some fundamental distinctions of Ockham and of Duns Scotus, concerning the particularity of being, are to be read against the background of their Trinitarian speculations.
church"--reminds me of the ninth-century Irish monk-scholar Sedulius Scotus, who wrote to his fellow Irish pilgrims after his visit to the eternal city: "Who to Rome goes, much labor, little profit knows; for God, on earth though long you've sought him, you'll miss at Rome, unless you've brought him.
I review the contributions to Scholastic economic philosophy made by Duns Scotus in the Opus Oxoniense, showing that Duns Scotus makes considerable advances in the understanding of exchange, the legitimization of trade, and the development of the Church's traditional teaching on usury.
Contrary to Anselm, Franciscan Blessed John Duns Scotus, a doctor of the church, did not argue that the Incarnation was necessary for the atonement or satisfaction for sin.
Bernard McGinn's portrait of Nicholas of Cusa as a theologian in the tradition of Maximus the Confessor, John Scotus Eriugena, and Meister Eckhart is one of the highlights of the volume.