Staphylococcus saprophyticus

(redirected from S. saprophyticus)

Staphylococcus saprophyticus

a coagulase negative species that causes urinary tract infections.

Staph·y·lo·coc·cus sap·ro·phy·tic·us

(staf'i-lō-kok'ŭs sap-rō-fī'ti-kŭs)
A bacterial species that has been associated with community-acquired urinary tract infections in young women who are sexually active; characterized in the laboratory as gram-positive cocci, but negative for catalase and coagulase.

Staphylococcus saprophyticus

A species that is the second most common cause of urinary tract infection in young, sexually active females. It is a rare cause of pneumonia.
See also: Staphylococcus
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this does not tell the full story, in that serious infections such as bacteraemia have been reported to be caused by S.
Since 2001, the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) Guidelines has recommended that "Routine testing of urine isolates of S.
saprophyticus, but with a resistant breakpoint of <15mm, and noted that S.
In order to resolve these discrepancies, the objective of this study was to compare detection of penicillinase in clinical isolates of S.
In comparison, evaluation of Phoenix penicillin MIC values showed that the majority of S.
While there are many publications evaluating the performance of these analysers, limited information is available on how they perform with S.
Only isolates M20 and M39 were misidentified by rpoB sequencing as S.
While many of the CoNS group are opportunistic pathogens, S.
Various resistance mechanisms have been reported, along with reports of recurrent urinary tract infections and isolation of S.
Urine cultures confirmed the clinical diagnosis, with a heavy growth of S.
Furthermore, rpoB gene sequencing revealed the methicillin resistant isolate to be part of the S.
The following day a repeat mid-stream urine culture still showed a raised white cell count and cultures grew a heavy S.