Roux-en-Y


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Roux-en-Y

 [roo-en-wi; Fr. roo-ahn-e-grek´]
denoting any Y-shaped anastomosis in which the small intestine is included.

Roux-en-Y

[ro̅o̅′ en wī′, ro̅o̅′änēgrek′]
Etymology: César Roux, Swiss surgeon, 1857-1926
a treatment for morbid obesity consisting of surgical division of the small intestine to form two arms; the jejunum is anastomosed to a gastric pouch and the bypassed duodenum connects the pylorus with an end-to-side anastomosis into the lower jejunum.
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Roux-en-Y

Roux-en-Y

(roo′ĕn-wī′)
An anastomosis of the distal divided end of the small bowel to another organ such as the stomach, pancreas, or esophagus. The proximal end is anastomosed to the small bowel below the anastomosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Surgical weight loss options include the Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass, Vertical Sleeve Gastrectomy and LAP-BAND Adjustable Gastric Band.
Preoperatively, most Roux-en-Y gastric bypass patients have a higher than normal BMD, "so even a loss of 10% over 2 years is not going to put most of them in the osteopenic or osteoporotic range.
Factors associated with a higher risk of postoperative AUD included male gender, younger age, smoking, regular alcohol consumption, a history of AUD, recreational drug use, low social support, and receiving Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.
As Roux-en-Y anastomoses have become popular with partial gastrectomies and Whipple's procedures, they too are prone to both forms of obstruction around the jejuno-jejunal Roux-en-Y anastomosis (Figs 2b and 5), possibly even more so.
Intussusception after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity: case report and literature review of rare complication.
The Roux-en-Y (RYGB) gastric bypass is the most common bariatric procedure (70%) and among the most successful (Figure 1).
In a new study, Jon Davis and colleagues at the University of Cincinnati in Ohio collected outcome data on 80,000 people in the US who had had weight-loss surgery, including Roux-en-Y.
BACKGROUND: The effects of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB) on bone in the long-term remains unclear.
Mikolich and colleagues at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine, Youngstown came to this conclusion after studying 50 patients who had undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery after failed attempts at medical weight loss.
Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, one of the most common procedures that can be used to cause significant weight loss in obese persons, involves creating a stomach pouch of a small portion of the stomach and attaching it directly to the small intestine, bypassing a large portion of the stomach and duodenum.
He has lost more than 16 stone since his Roux-en-Y gastric bypass, which has made his stomach 40 times smaller.
THE Roux-en-Y gastric bypass permanently converts the stomach into a very small pouch that holds 60ml instead of the 2,000ml to 3,000ml that an obese person is able to consume.