rote learning

(redirected from Rote memorization)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

rote learn·ing

the learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.

rote learn·ing

(rōt lĕrn'ing)
The learning of arbitrary relationships, usually by repetition of the learning procedure through memorization and without an understanding of the relationships.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most Chinese students consider rote memorization of basic facts as a pathway to more critical thinking, whereas American teachers discount the value of memorization and only emphasize critical thinking which grows from permitting students freedom to speak as they choose.
In several studies, social studies teachers operating in states whose social studies tests focused on the rote memorization of historical facts both added and cut curriculum content to align with the information on the tests (Fickel, 2006; Salinas, 2006; Segall, 2006; Smith, A.
One of the things we hear is that too much of what we do is based on rote memorization," he told The New York Times.
But by the 1940's, progressive educators considered rote memorization to be a form of slavish imitation, free from creativity or individualism.
By creating exams based not on rote memorization but instead on higher order thinking, problem-solving skills and written expression, they can powerfully affect how, and why, students cram for their exams.
They will complain that Chinese schools teach rote memorization but not creativity or love of learning.
It goes from being rote memorization, knowing how to do long division to here's how to work fractions and decimals and proportions.
Of the 71 participants, 69 stated they used rote memorization as the self-selected strategy.
Unfortunately most textbooks and other materials offer scant treatment of cliched situations, low level drills of rote memorization, and cultural facts in isolation, yielding possible misinterpretations of different cultural groups.
Instead of encouraging critical thinking, we encourage schools to deal with rote memorization and test taking," he said.
He concludes that Hal Maier "was doing exactly what good law professors are supposed to do: teach their charges how to think like lawyers--meaning both incisive analysis of the present and deep reflection about the future implications of legal choices--and not focus unduly on the rote memorization of rules.
It was designed to put greater emphasis on building children's ability to lean and think for themselves and to de-emphasize the role of rote memorization.