rotator cuff

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rotator cuff

n.
1. An anatomical structure composed of the tendons of four muscles that control rotation of the shoulder and of parts of the capsule of the shoulder joint.
2. The set of four muscles that control rotation of the shoulder.

rotator cuff

a musculotendinous structure about the capsule of the shoulder joint, formed by the inserting fibers of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus, teres minor, and subscapularis muscles, which blend with the capsule and provide mobility and strength to the shoulder joint.
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Rotator cuff

rotator cuff

The tendinous structure around the shoulder joint consisting of the tendons of four adjacent muscles blended with the capsule of the joint. Tearing or degeneration of any of these fibres may cause the common, painful and disabling rotator cuff syndrome in which there may be inability to raise the arm in a particular direction. Surgical repair may be necessary.

rotator cuff

four muscles (supraspinatus, subscapularis, infraspinatus and teres minor), which act in synergy at the shoulder joint to facilitate movement and provide stability by maintaining the head of the humerus in the glenoid cavity. In sport, most commonly injured in throwing, swimming and racquet sports with tears, tendonitis or (in young athletes) impingement.

Patient discussion about rotator cuff

Q. what does c4-5 mild central disk bulging impinging upon cervical cord without spinal stenosis or distortion of the cord . mild righ neural foraminal narrowing from uncovertebral joint hypertropy mean

A. Well this basically means there is a very small narrowing of the cervical (your neck area) spinal canal (where the spinal cord is), however the narrowing does not cause any damage to the spinal cord, therefore probably does not cause any major symptoms involving the nerves. The c4-5 bulging part refers to the part in between the two cervical vertebras c4 and c5, in which the disc (a part in the spinal cord) is sliding a bit side-ways, but again, it does not seem to be causing any trouble.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Most rotator cuff injuries are, however, managed non-operatively with anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDS), physiotherapy, home exercises, and ultrasound guided injections.
Fat suppression technique was applied and has been shown to improve sensitivity of MR evaluation of rotator cuff injuries.
The vast majority of rotator cuff injuries can be treated nonoperatively.
painters, drywallers), swimmers or people playing racquet sports are more likely to get chronic rotator cuff injuries.
Prevention: If you are a golfer or swimmer, or have other risks for rotator cuff injuries, these same exercises, performed regularly, can help strengthen your rotator cuff muscles and tendons and make them less susceptible to injury.
Shoulder dislocations occur when ligaments in the shoulder have been stretched or torn, following a fall, while rotator cuff injuries occur when the tendons covering the upper arm are torn.
According to the AAOS, about four million Americans seek medical attention for rotator cuff injuries each year.
The clinic's free program schedule for upcoming months includes strength and conditioning for the throwing athlete, pool therapy, rotator cuff injuries and more.
TABLE Summary of test characteristics of diagnostic studies for rotator cuff injuries FULL-THICKNESS ROTATOR CUFF TEAR DIAGNOSTIC STUDY SN SP LR+ LR- Clinical exam (1) 0.
The problem is not just for athletes: Workers' Compensation payments for rotator cuff injuries are estimated at $50,000 each, contributing to rising healthcare costs.