moment of inertia

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Moment of force = force (F) × distance (D) from the 'pivot' at the knee.

moment of inertia

a body or object's resistance to angular acceleration or deceleration. Depends on the mass of the object and the distribution of the mass in relation to the point of rotation. The summation of all the masses of the parts of the body multiplied by their distance squared from the axis of rotation (I = Σmr2) or the mass of the whole body multiplied by the radius of gyration squared.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tests run with the engine dynamometer at constant speed mitigate the influence of the engine rotational inertia on measured torque yielding a good dataset.
By adding mass far away from their bodies, the performers increase their rotational inertia.
In other words, solid helium does not behave as an ordinary solid, but exhibits nonclassical, or reduced, rotational inertia in the supersolid phase, as described by Tony Leggett.
conservative]) and inertia terms, namely, the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the wheelchair assembly ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), drive wheel spin rotational inertia ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), caster yoke assembly rigid body yaw rotational inertia ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), caster wheel spin rotational inertia ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), and the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the wheelchair occupant ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]).
Likewise, it is the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the occupant that dominates the reactance torque required for turning.
In spite of the fact that the inertia of the occupant dominates the reactance torque, changes in the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the wheelchair assembly ([I.
Of these, the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the occupant and the rigid body yaw rotational inertia of the wheelchair assembly are most significant, i.
The rotational inertia of manual wheelchairs is important because even a slight mass redistribution within the system can cause an affective change in required propulsion effort.
A few mouse clicks in a typical 3-D CAD environment, for example, provide the rotational inertia of your payload with respect to the motor shaft.
Less rotational inertia is required to accelerate and decelerate the wheels.
A long heavy arrow has a greater rotational inertia that opposes turning.
By using toe weighting, the rotational inertia is increased to reduce club rotation through impact.