rosulate


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rosulate

(rŏs′ū-lāt) [L. rosulatus, like a rose]
Shaped like a rosette.
References in periodicals archive ?
The epithet of this new species is a reference to its compact leaf rosette due to the comparatively shorter and densely rosulate leaves, which is a striking distinctive character of A.
As frequent species we can remark other shrubby halophytes such as Arthrocnemum macrostachyum, Suaeda vera or Halimione portulacoides; frequent rosulate hemicriptophytes are Limonium angustebracteatum, Limonium caesium, Limonium cossonianum and Limonium eugeniae.
Leaves rosulate to sub-rosulate; capitulescences of few capitula Adenocaulon 16b.
Basal leaves sessile, rosulate, simple, entire, awl-shaped or linear and grass-like, thick, parallel-veined; cauline leaves sessile, not auriculate at base, similar to basal ones but smaller, glabrous or pubescent.
Leaves 15 to 18 in number, subspreading-arcuate to distinctly recurved, densely rosulate and forming a distinct rosette before the anthesis and afterwards; sheaths inconspicuous; blades narrowly triangular, long attenuate-caudate, 30-58 cm long, 3-4.
Leaves usually rosulate or clustered at the median part of the stem; sessile to distinctly petiolate with petioles winged to wingless; blades linear, elliptic, obovate, deltoid to subrounded, palmately, pinnately, three- to five-veined, margin entire to partite, glabrous to pubescent on both surfaces or only beneath.
Structurally there is here -- compared to the other communities identified -- an evident increase of rosulate Hemycryptophyte probably due to the presence of both rich soils and a fair quantity of light at ground level (Table 1).
Epiphyte, rarely saxicolous, rosulate herbs, dioecious, flowering up to 1.
Leaves 30 to 35 in number, rosulate, densely arranged and forming a distinct rosette before anthesis and afterwards; sheaths inconspicuous; blades narrowly sublinear-triangular, 9-12 cm long, 0.
From the Greek onos, donkey, and seris, seridos, chicory, lettuce, probably because the rosulate leaves, lanceolate and tomentose beneath, which resemble the ears of a donkey.
Additionally, rosulate and multiradiate trichomes were only observed in section Lobatae (red oaks) (Hardin, 1979a, b).