LBC

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LBC

Abbreviation for:
lamellar body count
liquid-based cytology  
load-bearing capacity
lymphoid blast crisis

cytology

(si-tol'o-je) [ cyto- + -logy]
The science that deals with the formation, structure, and function of cells. cytologiccytological (sit?o-loj'ik) ('i-kal), adjective

exfoliative cytology

Microscopic examination of cells obtained from body excretions, e.g., from the anus or genitourinary tract.

imprint cytology

The study of cellular morphology or of tissue diseases after a clinical specimen, e.g., a bone marrow biopsy, is dabbed on a microscope slide. It is used in some settings as an adjunct or alternative to fine needle aspiration biopsy, frozen sectioning, and other pathological techniques.

liquid-based cytology

Abbreviation: LBC
A means of performing a Papanicolaou test (Pap test) in which the head of the plastic spatula used to obtain cells from the endocervix is inserted directly into a vial containing a fluid cellular preservative. The vial is spun in the laboratory, and a pellet of pure cells is obtained. This cellular layer is then deposited on a microscope slide and examined for evidence of cellular atypia or frank cancer. The liquid-based cytology differs from traditional cervical cytology in that the contents of the spatula are not smeared directly onto a microscope slide. This reduces the number of specimens received by the laboratory that are unable to be interpreted pathologically.

sputum cytology

The examination of cells obtained from mucus in the upper or lower respiratory tract to see if cancer cells are present. See: sputum specimen.

liquid-based cytology

Abbreviation: LBC
A means of performing a Papanicolaou test (Pap test) in which the head of the plastic spatula used to obtain cells from the endocervix is inserted directly into a vial containing a fluid cellular preservative. The vial is spun in the laboratory, and a pellet of pure cells is obtained. This cellular layer is then deposited on a microscope slide and examined for evidence of cellular atypia or frank cancer. The liquid-based cytology differs from traditional cervical cytology in that the contents of the spatula are not smeared directly onto a microscope slide. This reduces the number of specimens received by the laboratory that are unable to be interpreted pathologically.
See also: cytology