fraud

(redirected from Rort)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

fraud

[frôd]
Etymology: L, fraudare, to cheat
(in law) the act of intentionally misleading or deceiving another person by any means so as to cause him or her legal injury, usually the loss of something valuable or the surrender of a legal right resulting from the action of that person on the misrepresentation.

fraud

Managed care The intentional misrepresentation or deception resulting in payment(s) for services not rendered or payment above that normally paid. See Medicaid fraud, Medicare fraud Patient care Dishonest practice; breach of confidence. See AIDS fraud, Health fraud. Cf Misrepresentation.

fraud

(frawd)
An act of deliberate deception performed to acquire an unlawful benefit, such as the improper coding of health services in a claim for payment.

fraud

(frawd)
An act of deliberate deception performed to acquire an unlawful benefit.

fraud,

n an intentional perversion of truth for the purpose of inducing another, in reliance on it, to part with something valuable or to surrender a legal right; deliberate deception; deceit; trickery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Little Rort, blinkered for the first time, easily landed the claimer, completing O'Shea's double, and a double for trainer Michael Grassick, whose Embassy Belle took the first division of the mile-plus handicap under Niall McCullagh.
Winning trainer Michael Grassick said: "The Rort likes cut but he had been off the track for some time and I wasn't sure if he was quite fit enough.
In 1939, in order to avoid occasions for gross rorts, Queensland legislated that these transactions (both withdrawals and deposits) be recorded in a book signed or thumb-printed by the Aboriginal account holders and then countersigned by those responsible for passing over these small sums to them.
7) In 1991 a leading journal in Australia carried a lengthy item the opening paragraph of which read: "Directors of public companies are yet again about to have their legal obligations and duties increased as the authorities try to make up for the failure of regulators to prevent the corporate crashes and rorts of the 1980s.
Glaser and Laster (1990) supported this view when they declared that individual worker's are scapegoats for the costs and rorts of the workers compensation scheme.
and those thinking like them, really to get the upper hand here, an enormous clean-out of rorts, rackets, phonies and mountebanks would follow, as we know.
The Little Black Book of Scams: A Consumer's Guide to Scams, Swindles, Rorts and Rip-offs' is an initiative of the Ministerial Council of Consumer Affairs, and was published with assistance from the Australian Securities and Investments Commission and the Australian Consumer and Competition Commission.
2010) 'Thousands of pink batts rorts exposed', The Australian, 16 October.
It has been getting steadily more and more unequal courtesy of basic changes in the distribution of wage work, the respective share of income going to wage earners and capital holders and the accumulated effects of tax reform and tax rorts like negative gearing.
The phrase `bottom of the harbour' had little to do with marine ecology and a lot to do with tax rorts made possible by black letter law under Sir Garfield's strong right hand.