fraud

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fraud

[frôd]
Etymology: L, fraudare, to cheat
(in law) the act of intentionally misleading or deceiving another person by any means so as to cause him or her legal injury, usually the loss of something valuable or the surrender of a legal right resulting from the action of that person on the misrepresentation.

fraud

Managed care The intentional misrepresentation or deception resulting in payment(s) for services not rendered or payment above that normally paid. See Medicaid fraud, Medicare fraud Patient care Dishonest practice; breach of confidence. See AIDS fraud, Health fraud. Cf Misrepresentation.

fraud

(frawd)
An act of deliberate deception performed to acquire an unlawful benefit, such as the improper coding of health services in a claim for payment.

fraud

(frawd)
An act of deliberate deception performed to acquire an unlawful benefit.

fraud,

n an intentional perversion of truth for the purpose of inducing another, in reliance on it, to part with something valuable or to surrender a legal right; deliberate deception; deceit; trickery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Little Rort, blinkered for the first time, easily landed the claimer, completing O'Shea's double, and a double for trainer Michael Grassick, whose Embassy Belle took the first division of the mile-plus handicap under Niall McCullagh.
Winning trainer Michael Grassick said: "The Rort likes cut but he had been off the track for some time and I wasn't sure if he was quite fit enough.
This rort was a blatant abuse of the welfare system and an offence to hard working Australians who expect their taxes to be spent helping those in need.
2015) 'Federal Government announces changes to 457 skilled visa program after review into rorts and abuse', The World Today, 18th March.
Writing in the Dominion on 14th December, 2004, Gerry Brownlee, the then deputy leader of National, stated, "National will ensure the beaches and lakes remain in Crown ownership for all New Zealanders, require all Treaty claims to be settled by 2010, treat people on the basis of need rather than race, end the rorts associated with iwi consultation, and wind up separate Maori electorates in line with the recommendations from the 1987 Royal Commission on MMP.
They remarked on politicians getting away with dishonest acts such as travel rorts, and private use of public monies whilst their own young friends are gaoled and harshly dealt with over petty theft matters.
Cost overruns, rorts, complexity, tardiness, power imbalances and moral hazard count among the perennial concerns.
These men, many of whom were profiting handsomely from the material crime and compensation rorts that characterised the post-coup period and continued despite the signing of the Townsville Peace Agreement in October 2000, had more to lose by the intervention of RAMSI in July 2003 than did their Gaule counterparts (with the important exception of Harold Keke and his followers) or any other island or provincial ethnic grouping (see, in particular, Dinnen 2002 and Fraenkel 2004).
A number of private companies have already submitted their proposals for the lucrative port, and as Iraq looks to establish itself as a major shipping destination further opportunities are become available for commercial operators to meet with the state company for rorts and discuss supplying the key services needed to aid this regeneration of this important sector.
And will the new incentives see a return to the sharp practices and outright rorts that blighted the production boom under the Division 10BA tax incentives in the 1980s?
In 1939, in order to avoid occasions for gross rorts, Queensland legislated that these transactions (both withdrawals and deposits) be recorded in a book signed or thumb-printed by the Aboriginal account holders and then countersigned by those responsible for passing over these small sums to them.
7) In 1991 a leading journal in Australia carried a lengthy item the opening paragraph of which read: "Directors of public companies are yet again about to have their legal obligations and duties increased as the authorities try to make up for the failure of regulators to prevent the corporate crashes and rorts of the 1980s.