Rorschach test


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Related to Rorschach test: Thematic Apperception Test, personality test

Rorschach test

 [ror´shahk]
one for disclosing personality traits and conflicts by the patient's interpretation of 10 cards bearing symmetrical ink blots in various colors and shadings.

Ror·schach test

(rōr'shahk),
a projective psychological test in which the subject reveals his or her attitudes, emotions, and personality by reporting what is seen in each of ten inkblot pictures.
Synonym(s): inkblot test

Rorschach test

(rôr′shäk′, -shäKH′)
n.
A psychological test in which a subject's interpretations of a series of standard inkblots are analyzed as an indication of personality traits, preoccupations, and conflicts.

Rorschach test

[rôr′shäk, rôr′shokh]
Etymology: Hermann Rorschach, Swiss psychiatrist, 1884-1922
a projective personality assessment test developed by Hermann Rorschach. It consists of 10 pictures of inkblots, five in black and white, three in black and red, and two multicolored, to which the subject responds by telling, in as many interpretations as is desired, what images and emotions each design evokes. Replies are evaluated according to whether the response is to the entire or only part of the image; whether color, shading, shape, or location of individual elements is significant; whether movement is seen; and the degree of complexity to which each interpretation is given. Scoring is primarily subjective and is based on both the subject's responses and the general reaction to the circumstances under which the test is administered. The test is designed to assess the degree to which intellectual and emotional factors are integrated in the subject's perception of the environment. See also Holtzman inkblot technique.
A widely use projective personality test in which 10 vertically symmetrical ink blots are presented to a person or patient to evaluate what they ‘see’ in the ‘picture’

Rorschach test

Ink blot test, Rorschach technique of projective assessment Psychology A personality test in which 10 ink blots are presented to an individual for an interpretation of what is seen in the 'picture'. See Psychological testing.

Ror·schach test

(rōr'shahk test)
A projective psychological test of personality in which the subject reveals attitudes, emotions, and personality by reporting what is seen in each of ten inkblot pictures in a standard set.
Synonym(s): inkblot test.

Rorschach test

See INK BLOT TEST. (Hermann Rorschach, 1884–1922, German-born Swiss psychiatrist).

Rorschach test

A well-known projective test that requires the patient to describe what he or she sees in each of 10 inkblots. It is named for the Swiss psychiatrist who invented it.
Mentioned in: Personality Disorders

Rorschach,

Hermann, Swiss psychiatrist, 1884-1922.
Behn-Rorschach test - see under Behn-Eschenburg
Rorschach test - a projective psychological test. Synonym(s): inkblot test

Rorschach test (ror´shak),

n.pr better known as the inkblot test, this test consists of 10 pictures of inkblots, five in black and white, three in black and red, and two multicolored, to which the subject responds by telling, in as many interpretations as is desired, what images and emotions each design evokes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Rorschach test could also be applied to patients diagnosed with cancer following their treatment with the intention to foresee a relapse or a metastasis, applying the criteria resulting from the present study.
However, the scoring method from individual Rorschach test protocols is far too complicated to sieve out families, and therefore the method needs to be simplified.
But if India was, for them, a kind of Rorschach test, it was also shock treatment: "Obstacles were in fact what most travelers encountered in India.
Mark Twain may be the consummate Rorschach test for anyone who sets out to understand the United States," declares Fishkin.
My favourite chapter, `Hilary Clinton as Rorschach Test,' cites the now famous response to her career aspirations when she noted that she could have stayed home and baked cookies and had teas.
In the end, all of this becomes a national and personal Rorschach test, in which one's reaction to what is presented is more revelatory than the actual problems and issues at hand.
Gilbert, a psychologist, administered the Rorschach test, along with other measures of mental ability and personality, to most of the 23 upper echelon Nazi defendants on trial at Nuremberg, including Herman Goering (creator of the Gestapo and the concentration camps), Rudolf Hess (Hitler's deputy), and Albert Speer (Hitler's architect and munitions minister).
Readers less familiar with the topic might well conclude, after completing the two collections, that The Mind of the South is a type of Rorschach Test designed by its author especially for scholars of the American South.
As might be expected, given the conflicting cultural codes that governed the construction of race and race relations, his order was a kind of racial Rorschach test for his subordinates.
Judging by the contradictory statements that followed the Supreme Court's June 29 ruling on developer David Lucas' case (see "Pigs in the Parlor," May/June), the court's opinion was more a political Rorschach test than a resolution of the clash between environmentalists and private-property absolutists.
Rorschach test was administered to the patient according to the standardized testing procedure.
Unlike questionnaires, which are more fashionable these days,' she says, "people bring stuff from their guts to the Rorschach test because of its projective nature.