New Deal

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New Deal

A work compensation and conditions package agreed to by junior doctors’ representatives, NHS management, and Government in 1999, which was designed to address the unsocial hours and poor working conditions to which junior doctors where subjected. The maximum contracted hours for each work pattern by junior doctors was agreed as:
• 72 hours/week for on-call rotas;
• 64 hours/week for partial shifts;
• 56 hours/week for full shifts.

New Deal for Junior Doctors
• Limits on number of hours worked/week and on work during unsocial hours;
• Safety and security (job protection);
• Protected rest periods;
• Acceptable accommodations;
• Catering facilities that meet quality standards;
References in periodicals archive ?
Poole's book is one of those works that provide the missing links about racism in the United States and is simply a must-read for anyone who wants to establish the relationship between contemporary welfare policy and its roots in racism emerging from Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal.
Roosevelt's New Deal was 'socialism,''' Tsurumi said.
She argued that Roosevelt's New Deal, Hitler's Germany, and especially Stalin's Russia represented varieties of a new stage of global capitalism" (p.
President Roosevelt's New Deal and Japan Finance Minister Korekiyo Takahashi's aggressive policies helped pull their respective economies out of their bottomless quagmire.
He contends that the party has strayed from its modern roots in Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal and the Great Society that grew out of the Kennedy-Johnson administrations.
Pittsburgh's Catholic New Deal differed in important respects from Roosevelt's New Deal, however.
Irons notes that "In a statement that would have made little sense to textile workers suffering from stretch-out, Senator Robert Wagner, a dedicated worker's advocate, explained that under Roosevelt's New Deal, 'efficiency, rather than the ability to sweat labor .
Were it not for his electoral triumphs and the congressional influence that they afforded him, Roosevelt's New Deal would scarcely have been dealt.
The limits of President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal reforms were soon exposed in the South, where local elites' control over the administration of federal programs allowed for discrimination against African Americans and the displacement of thousands of sharecroppers and tenants from the land.
Roosevelt's New Deal set out to bring "relief, recovery, and reform" to the beleaguered populace.
Their sudden switch during Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal seems odd: New Deal agencies helped drive black sharecroppers off their land, and Roosevelt refused to support federal anti-lynching bills and efforts to restore black voting rights.
Roosevelt's New Deal coalition between working-class Americans and liberal elites.