rolling circle replication

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rolling circle replication or sigma (r) replication

a mode of REPLICATION for some double-stranded circular DNA (or RNA) molecules, such as certain BACTERIOPHAGE GENOMES. A NICK is first introduced into one of the strands of the double-stranded molecule. The other strand remains closed and serves as a TEMPLATE for DNA synthesis. The circular structure ‘rolls’ as synthesis proceeds, and the open strand is gradually displaced, creating a tail. The tail also serves as a template for DNA synthesis. As rolling circle replication continues unabated a CONCATEMER may form from the tail, where many turns of the circle occur before the tail is cut to generate a monomer. Since the molecular structure created during the replication process resembles the Greek letter sigma, it is also referred to as replication. This is the way certain VIRUSES achieve replication of the genome.

rolling circle replication

a description of the replication of circular DNA molecules in which linear daughter DNA molecules that contain repeated DNA sequences called concatemers are produced from the parent; the concatemers are cleaved to form unit length genomes which themselves circularize.
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While complementary strand has been reported to encode two replication associated proteins (instead of one, as in other geminiviruses), (1) RepA in trans-activation of late (virion-sense) genes as well as reported to establish a cellular environment conducive for virus replication and (2) RepB, which may be translated from alternatively spliced sense transcripts and required for replication, initiating and terminating rolling circle DNA replication and for the interference of the cell cycle.