rod cell

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Related to Rod cells: rhodopsin, Cone cells
Neuroanatomy A retinal photoreceptor for colourless low-light vision
Neuropathology A modified microglial cell that increases in size and number in paretic dementia (3º syphilis) and subacute encephalitides (e.g., encephalitis lethargica and cerebral trypanosomiasis)

rod

(rod)
1. A straight, slender, cylindric structure or device. For surgical rods, see nail;pin
2. The photosensitive, outward-directed process of a rhodopsin-containing rod cell in the external granular layer of the retina; many millions of such rods, together with the cones, form the photoreceptive layer of rods and cones.
Synonym(s): rod cell.
[A.S. rōd]

rod

or

rod cell

a rod-shaped, light-sensitive cell lying in the more peripheral parts of the RETINA in the vertebrate eye. Rods are particularly associated with vision under conditions of low illumination and they occur in large numbers in nocturnal animals. They are not capable of colour discrimination and their visual acuity is poor (compare CONE CELL). RHODOPSIN (visual purple) is found in rods. There are some 240 million rods in the retinas of a primate.see RETINAL CONVERGENCE.

rod

(rod)
1. A straight, slender, cylindric structure or device.
2. The photosensitive, outward-directed process of a rhodopsin-containing rod cell in the external granular layer of the retina.
[A.S. rōd]
References in periodicals archive ?
Single-photon detection by rod cells of the retina, Rev.
Note the ciliated non-sensory cells (CN), microvillus (MV), and supporting cells (S) and rod cells (RD).
In darkness, the rod cell plasmalemma is depolarized and the rods secrete neurotransmitters.
For the blind mice, Swaroop and other researchers would have to figure out how to make new rod cells.
their eyes have many cone cells, relatively few rod cells
By selectively modulating the visual cycle in rod cells, we believe that ACU-4429 protects cone cells and by extension protects visual acuity.
Rhodopsins are the primary visual pigment in rod cells in the mammalian retina.
When using "averted vision", you are using the light sensitivity of those outer-lying rod cells.
So researchers packaged the gene for a light-detecting pigment called rhodopsin, found in functional rod cells, inside a virus.
Muller cells harvested from human donor tissue were transplanted into the retinas of blind rats where they developed into rod cells which were responsive to light signals.
Like the mirror of a telescope pointed toward the night sky, the eye's rod cells capture the energy of photons - the individual particles that make up light.
Ali's group transplanted immature rod cells from newborn mice into the retinas of night-blind adult mice.