Rockall score

Rockall score

(rok′al″)
An assessment tool to gauge the prognosis of patients who have acute bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract. Advanced age, hypotension, the presence of other significant illnesses, evidence of active bleeding during endoscopy, and evidence of gastrointestinal malignancy are factors that are all associated with a worse outcome in the bleeding patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Though the Rockall score has been validated for variceal haemorrhage the Child-Pugh score [15] (Table 3) is most commonly used to stratify risk.
1) Stratification systems, such as the Rockall score and Forrest classification, which are based on clinical and endoscopic factors, respectively, define those at high risk.
The Rockall score, a validated admission and post-endoscopy risk assessment scoring system that incorporates age, presence of shock, co-morbidity and the endoscopic stigmata of bleeding, was calculated for each patient.
There was also no significant difference when comparing the Rockall score, ulcer type, current use of NSAIDs and/or salicylates, use of PPI, presence of H.
A high Rockall score was the only predictor of death by D30 (OR 1.
However, the Rockall score was not found to be a significant predictor for surgery.
Medical co-morbidity accounted for these deaths, a factor supported in our study by the use of the Rockall score as a predictor of death by D30.
Recently, the Rockall score (5) has been found to be useful in predicting mortality and also re-bleeding rates, but its value in predicting long-term mortality was not evaluated.
Though the Rockall score has been validated for variceal haemorrhage the Child-Pugh score (15) (Table 3) is most commonly used to stratify risk.