rock climbing

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An ‘extreme sport’ in which the participant climbs rock formations—including sheer rock faces—with or without ropes
Injury risk Abrasions, fractures, death

rock climbing

Sports medicine An 'extreme sport' in which the participant climbs rock formations, with or without ropes Injury risk Fractures, abrasions, death. See Extreme sports.
References in periodicals archive ?
As for Norwegian Cruise Lines, the best kids' facilities are on board Norwegian Epic, including rock-climbing and abseiling walls, a bungee trampoline and 10-pin bowling alleys.
In 1958, a team led by rock-climbing legend Warren Harding took 18 months to drill bolts and hammer big nails called pitons into the rock to which they attached ropes.
After the hike, we relaxed over lunch at Hidden Valley Campground and watched rock-climbing daredevils creep up the buff-colored stone like human lizards.
Outside the classroom, the lessons are on wilderness skills and rock-climbing.
Shoes: Rock-climbing shoes are an absolute must and are generally worn very snug.
First introduced on Voyager of the Seas in 1999, the rock-climbing walls quickly captured national interest and became a star attraction on each new Royal Caribbean ship that followed.
Our rock-climbing instructors from EarthTreks were waiting for us.
Rock-climbing gyms with walls higher than forty-five feet have sprung up all around the country.
The event also will feature guerilla marketing teams - dressed in rock-climbing gear - that will spread the word about the Belay launch that day and across Chicagoland in the coming weeks at sports restaurants, near home improvement stores and other venues.
The closure will detour hikers onto Angeles Crest Highway for about 4 1/2 miles and also will bar climbers from a granite outcropping known as Williamson Rock, among the most popular rock-climbing spots in the San Gabriel Mountains.
Suspended by rock-climbing rope from vertical rock faces and manmade structures, the seven dancers of Oakland, California-based Project Bandaloop are small in number but big on spectacle.
They involved upside-down postmodern technique, dancing with bungee cords, hoops, low-flying motivity trapezes, rock-climbing ropes, harness and walls, fabric, a suspended steel merry-go-round, flying poles, and even stilts.