Southey

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South·ey

(sow'thē),
Reginald, English physician, 1835-1899. See: Southey tubes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to proposing this discursive motivation from the history of ideas, my argument will also attribute a peculiarly social drive, which is part of Coleridge's relationship with Robert Southey, to the revision of the poem.
1774: Poet Laureate and historian Robert Southey was born in Bristol.
Unable or unwilling to stand under the window himself, Lloyd eloped by proxy, getting his friend Robert Southey, to do the eloping for him.
Long gone are the days when men such as Lord Sidmouth and Robert Southey advised that any opinion that came from outside the walls of Westminster or the Palace was not to be heeded.
EXTRACT OF THE PAUPER'S FUNERAL, BY ROBERT SOUTHEY Haunted by Poverty and woe-begone, Unloved, unfriended, thou didst journey on: Thy youth in ignorance and labour past, And thine old age all barrenness and blast
On several occasions, second choices have got the nod (as was the case in 1813 when Robert Southey was appointed on the refusal of Sir Walter Scott, and again in 1984 when the refusal of Philip Larkin left the way open for Ted Hughes).
She describes such aspects of this early Celtic revival as textual fidelity and critical failure, nostalgia and incorporation in Thomas Gray and Robert Southey, re-imaging the Druid, and Eisteddfodau.
Eliot, with the eighteenth century in mind: and few poets better illustrate the truth of his insight than Robert Southey (1774-1843).
8) See our article "Zukovskij's Early Translations of the Ballads of Robert Southey," SEEJ, IX (1965), 181-190.
A bewildering array of representations emerges as Astell traces Joan's influence on Robert Southey, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Thomas De Quincey, whose Jacobin Joan somehow evades religious sanctity altogether, to George Bernard Shaw, whose version of Joan looks suspiciously like an opponent of feudalism and a Protestant martyr to boot.
Also in the cast are Samuel West, as poet Robert Southey - who wrote The Three Bears - and Samantha Morton and Emily Woof, who play Dorothy Wordsworth and Sara Coleridge.
In Reminiscences, Thomas Carlyle uses descriptions of his father, his wife Jane, and the poet Robert Southey to create two gendered dichotomies: silence and speech, and writing and speech.