Koch, Robert

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Koch, Robert

(1843–1910) German bacteriologist who first introduced the method of making bacterial smears and fixing them with heat. He worked on bubonic plague and sleeping sickness and discovered how they are transmitted. He also developed means of culturing bacteria on AGAR, and rules for properly identifying the agents of various diseases. He is most famous for establishing a series of criteria necessary to establish whether a specific microorganism causes a specific disease. These criteria are known as Koch's Postulates:
  1. the microorganisms must be present in every case of the disease.
  2. the microorganisms must be isolated from the diseased organism and grown in culture in vitro.
  3. the disease must be reproduced when a pure culture is reintroduced to a nondiseased, susceptible host.
  4. the microorganism must be recoverable from the experimentally infected host.

Koch,

Robert, German bacteriologist and Nobel laureate, 1843-1910.
Koch bacillus - (1) a species that causes tuberculosis. Synonym(s): Mycobacterium tuberculosis; - (2) a species that causes cholera. Synonym(s): Vibrio cholerae
Koch blue bodies - schizonts of Theileria parva, the causative agent of East Coast fever.
Koch law - Synonym(s): Koch postulates
Koch old tuberculin
Koch original tuberculin
Koch phenomenon - infection immunity.
Koch postulates - to establish the specificity of a pathogenic microorganism, it must be present in all cases of the disease; inoculations of its pure cultures must produce disease in animals, and from these it must be again obtained and be propagated in pure cultures. Synonym(s): Koch law
Koch-Weeks bacillus - a species found in the respiratory tract; causes acute respiratory infections. Synonym(s): Haemophilus influenzae; Weeks bacillus
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Koch enuncio sus ya famosos postulados en el curso de sus investigaciones sobre el carbunco bacteridiano, una enfermedad que se transmitia de forma frecuente al hombre desde el ganado lanar y vacuno.
The Robert Koch prize is given annually to those who have contributed to the basic research in the study of infectious diseases.
Roma Schmitz and her colleagues from the Robert Koch Institute investigated whether vaccinations put too much strain on or weaken children's immune systems.
The German physician and scientist Robert Koch (1843-1910) was pioneer in identification of pathogens, winning the Nobel Prize for his work on tuberculosis.
But none did much about it until Louis Pasteur, Edward Jenner and Robert Koch came along and joined the battle against disease.
The presenter of this monumental work was Robert Koch, who rose from humble beginnings as a country doctor to the pinnacle of scientific achievement.
On March 24, 1882, Robert Koch announced that he had isolated the tubercle bacillus, proving for the first time that the disease, then known as consumption, was caused by a germ.
It describes the nature and identification of the etiological agent, Salmonella; two famous outbreaks (the Plague of Athens and the final illness and death of Alexander the Great); the deaths from typhoid fever of major figures in history; the roles of Thomas Willis, William Wood Gerhard, Pierre-Charles-Alexandre Louis, Robert Koch, Walter Reed, William Budd, and others; the diagnostic test developed by Fernand Widal and Albert GrEnbaum; the story of oTyphoid Maryo; the work of Almroth Wright and others in vaccination; typhoid in the American army; and typhoid in the 21st century.
The Robert Koch Institute (RKI) said the last case related to the E.
The GEDA study (Gesundheit in Deutschland Aktuell, or Current Health in Germany) was carried out in 2008-2009 by the Robert Koch Institute.
Also covered are biological weapons and bioterrorism, theories of disease, the emergence of microbiology, and individuals who contributed to the field, such as Louis Pasteur and Robert Koch.
The samples available from seven chimps that died revealed either human respiratory syncytial virus or human metapneumovirus, says Fabian Leendertz, a wildlife epidemiologist at the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin.