Kennedy

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Ken·ne·dy

(ken'ĕ-dē),
Edward, early 20th-century U.S. dentist. See: Kennedy classification.

Ken·ne·dy

(ken'ĕ-dē),
Robert Foster, U.S. neurologist, 1884-1952. See: Kennedy syndrome, Foster Kennedy syndrome.

Ken·ne·dy

(ken'ĕ-dē),
William, U.S. neurologist. See: Kennedy disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kennedy was more than just a celebrity, and Schmitt convincingly concludes that, through deeds and words, by 1968 Kennedy had convinced the nation's poor and racial minorities that he was genuinely concerned with their plights, and "the hope that many excluded Americans vested in Robert Kennedy brought a greater sense of community to the United States" (230).
Flown to New York for the funeral in St Patrick's Cathedral, the body was then taken by special train to Washington DC, past enormous grieving crowds, and Robert Kennedy was buried at dead of night, close to his brother John in the Arlington National Cemetery.
Robert Kennedy went on to play a key role in Operation Mongoose, the program approved by the president in November 1961 to use covert pressure to topple Fidel Castro.
Just one night later, before a hushed crowd of blacks in Indianapolis, where he was to have made a campaign speech, Robert Kennedy broke the terrible news that Dr.
Items included the columnist's 1992 Cadillac (with license plate "AL 55" for the year she started her advice feature), desk, IBM electronic typewriter, owl statues, and books autographed by people such as Erma Bombeck, Robert Kennedy, and Richard Nixon.
In Love with Night: The American Romance with Robert Kennedy, by Ronald Steel, New York: Simon and Schuster, 224 pages, $23
For New Zealanders the most important impact of the quintessential politicians Lyndon Johnson and Robert Kennedy was their actions and feud over the Vietnam War, which has shaped United States foreign policy for 30 years.
Douglas); that he was a hipster (Norman Mailer); that he was our first alienated, existential pol, a cross between Bob Dylan and Albert Camus (Jack Newfield); and that" [w]ho sketches Robert Kennedy does so at his peril" (Joseph Kraft in a sketch of Robert Kennedy).
During the final curtain call Bejart [said], "I ask for a minute of silence in memory of Robert Kennedy, victim of violence and fascism.
In June in Los Angeles, Robert Kennedy was shot in the head by another "lone gunman," Sirhan Sirhan.
I am going to travel the length and breadth of this country, as Robert Kennedy did thirty years ago and as Eleanor Roosevelt did during the Depression, to observe the face of American poverty -- not from behind a Senate desk, but in the streets, the villages, and neighborhoods of those in distress," Wellstone says.