Rivea corymbosa


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Riv·e·a co·rym·bo·sa

(riv'ē-ă kō'rim-bō'să),
Mexican bindweed, a plant of the family Convolvulaceae, the seeds of which were used in ceremonies by the Aztecs and contain lysergic acid amide, isolysergic acid, lysergic acid monoethylamide, chanoclavine, and other indole alkaloids; several hundred seeds must be ingested to produce hallucinatory and euphoric effects.

Rivea corymbosa

a twining vine of the botanical family of Convolvulaceae. The seeds contain indole alkaloids, a source of lysergic acid diethylamide, which have an effect of altered perception when ingested in large quantities. The seeds have been used in religious ceremonies of indigenous Latin American cultures since the era of the Aztecs. Also called Mexican bindweed, morning glory.
References in periodicals archive ?
These alkaloids are also found in the seeds of morning glory, Rivea corymbosa [7].