Rindfleisch

Rind·fleisch

(rint'flīsh),
Georg E., German physician, 1836-1908. See: Rindfleisch folds.
References in periodicals archive ?
While, under high technological turbulent conditions, firms may be pressured to acquire external, new knowledge contained outside their organizational boundaries, managers are also often burdened with increased demand for information processing (Tushman and Nadler 1978; Rindfleisch and Moorman 2001).
Upon leaving the service, he married the love of his life, Joan Rindfleisch and, together, they moved to West Boylston, where they raised their four children.
2006), including personal health information (Institute of Medicine 1997; Rindfleisch 1997; Rothstein 2007).
The importance of the fundamental question of whether it is effective or, instead, counterproductive to complement relational governance with formal control has been highlighted in a call for research by Rindfleisch et al.
The research, conducted by Rindfleisch and co-authors Ayalla Ruvio, of Michigan State University, and Eli Somer, of the University of Haifa, studied the experience of traumatic stress and maladaptive consumption through an Israeli field study and a U.
One of the most oft cited reasons in the literature for foster parent burnout is a perceived or real lack of support (Gibbs & Wildfire, 2007; Hamilton, 2011; Marcenko, Brennan & Lyons, 2009; Office of the Inspector General, 2002b; Rindfleisch, Bean & Denby, 1998).
Materialism has emerged as a topic of great interest among scholars across a broad range of disciplines, including social psychologists, demographers, political scientists, and consumer researchers (Burroughs and Rindfleisch 2002; Kilboume, Grunhagen, and Foley 2005).
programs and industries department chief/senior chief petty officer, Michael Johnston, corrections specialist, Christopher Julson, logistics specialist/clerk, Mathew McPaul, correction supervisor, Ferguson Oldag, corrections specialist, Undre Partee, security ops, Brandy Rindfleisch, watch captain/correction specialist, Guy Rolon, programs and industries, Jennifer Tillard, corrections specialist
For instance, strong ties are typically assumed to share both high levels of embeddedness and high levels of redundancy; however, the findings of Rindfleisch and Moorman (2001) indicate that this assumption does not hold for organizational contexts.
The differences in business operation methods within the network may lead to a greater chance that members lack a common target and therefore the motivation for cooperation (Goerzen and Beamish, 2005; Rindfleisch and Moorman, 2001).
It's Not Just a Defensive Game: Preventing, Handling and Healing Environmental Intolerances, Adam Rindfleisch, MPhil, MD, Director, Integrative Medicine Fellowship University of Wisconsin-Madison, Dept.