Rigveda

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Related to Rig Veda: Atharva Veda

Rigveda

Herbal medicine
An ancient Hindu scripture which describes more than 1000 herbal remedies and their uses.
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In support of his interpretation Wasson cited several passages from the Rig Veda, including the following:
Also, consider the soma sacrifice as described in the Rig Veda, and the description of the burnt offering made after the great flood in the Epic of Gilgamesh and in the Hebrew book of Genesis.
I also think that the debate was carried out beneath the surface of texts that seem to be about something else entirely, in a number of the later hymns of the Rig Veda.
The Vedic section considers, in order, the Sarasvati materials in the Rig Veda, Atharva Veda, Yajur Veda, and Brahmanas; the second section evidence from the Mahdbharata and some early Puranas, primarily the Markandeya, the Matsya, and the Vayu.
I have found that as early as the Rig Veda the birth of the universe was mythopoeically explained by analogy to human birth.
Parpola had earlier stunned Orientalists by asserting that the Rig Veda had several distinctive Dravidian features.
Function and Form in the -aya-Formations of the Rig Veda and Atharva Veda.
The specific focus of the work is the rare and shadowy figure of the Gandharva in the Rig Veda (the word occurs twenty times), and the author attempts to connect it thematically and functionally with the Gandharva in much later Buddhist texts, particularly the Tibetan Book of the Dead and the Abhidharmakosa.
Like her previous books on the Rig Veda, the Kama Sutra, Doniger does not wish away the frailties of characters from Hindu mythology, even gods that have been revered for several thousand of years find their personalities being critiqued.
A number of the words Ronzitti counts as primary -ma- derivatives have older- and better-attested -man-stems alongside: here dharman-, which occurs well over fifty times in the Rig Veda, beside dharma-, which begins to be attested (scantily) only in the Atharva Veda.
It explores with substantial learning and meticulous philological care every proposed female name in the Rig Veda and in the Avesta, paying particular attention to possible etymology (/-ies), formation (compound type, etc.
The author's purview extends from the Rig Veda into the period of the Upanisads and older Srauta Sutras, and this particularly large range allows the development of the formation to be followed for much of its living history.