ribozyme

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ri·bo·zyme

(rī'bō-zīm),
A nonprotein RNA biocatalyst; several cleave precursors of tRNA to yield functional tRNAs; others act on rRNA; plays a key role in intron splicing events.
Synonym(s): organic catalyst (1) , RNA enzyme
[ribonucleic acid + -zyme]

ribozyme

(rī′bə-zīm′)
n.
An RNA molecule that acts as a catalyst, especially for the cleavage of RNA strands at specific sites.

ribozyme

One of a unique class of RNA molecules that can act as cleaving enzymes in addition to storing genetic information. This is a notable exception to the general rule that all enzymes are proteins. Ribozymes form complementary base pairs in the normal manner but can cleave segments of nascent RNA during the splicing process of the formation of mature RNA transcripts of DNA. Ribozymes can be used in various ways as treatment modalities.

ribozyme

an RNA molecule with catalytic activity. Ribozymes include (a) molecules involved in processing RNA precursor molecules by cleaving PHOSPHODIESTER BONDS, for example in self-SPLICING of some precursor rRNA INTRONS; and (b) molecules catalysing key cellular reactions, for example rRNA of the large ribosomal subunit (see RIBOSOME), which is closely involved with the peptidyl transferase activity that catalyses PEPTIDE BOND formation in TRANSLATION. Ribozymes are found in EUCARYOTES, PROKARYOTES, VIRUSES and VIROIDS.

ribozyme

enzyme whose catalytic function is carried out by an RNA subunit; of the four known classes, three carry out self processing reactions while the fourth, ribonuclease P (RNase P), is a true catalyst; discovered in the context of RNA splicing.
References in periodicals archive ?
No one had ever made or even tried to make a ribozyme that worked cross-chirally, on opposite-handed RNA.
Moreover, the researchers found that the viral load of mice treated with the ribozyme-carrying Salmonella was 400- to 600-times lower than the viral load for mice given the defective ribozymes and for mice that were untreated.
If a ribozyme like the Diels-Alderase is capable of doing organic chemistry to build up complex molecules, then potentially something like that could have been present to create the building blocks of life.
In this instance the level of vif expression in cells transfected with the catalytic and non-catalytic ribozymes appeared to be the same.
However, we believe that the second mechanism may be advantageous to synthesize large RNA by primitive catalytic RNA, and ribozymes with RNA ligation activity might have been an essential catalytic activity in t he RNA world.
Ribozymes -- naturally occurring segments of RNA -- can act as human therapeutics; RPI currently is developing treatments for cancer, Hepatitis C and HIV.
This hypothesis needs to be examined in light of the null hypothesis: that modern, viral tRNA tags were invented by opportunistic viruses at some time following the reign of ribozymes.
He has created a molecule that mimics the behavior of a kind of naturally occurring RNA called a ribozyme, which acts as a catalyst.
Ribozymes, however, can be designed to cut up the very genetic material that HIV would need to reproduce itself.
Not only do ribozymes prevent the infection of human immune cells by the virus, they also block viral replication in cells that are infected.
Also in 1991, Cech's laboratory reported similar activity in ribozymes.
In the early 1980s, researchers found that ribozymes -- RNA enzymes -- act as catalysts.