riboflavin

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riboflavin

 [ri´bo-fla″vin]
vitamin B2, a component of flavin adenine dinucleotide and flavin mononucleotide, coenzymes that are prosthetic groups for flavoproteins, enzymes that catalyze many oxidation-reduction reactions. Foods with the highest content of riboflavin are liver, kidney, heart, brewer's yeast, milk, eggs, greens, and enriched cereals, bread, and other grain products. Riboflavin deficiency (ariboflavinosis) is most common among people in regions such as Asia and the West Indies where the diet contains large quantities of corn, potatoes, or rice (white rice that is not enriched), which lack riboflavin. A well-balanced diet will prevent riboflavin deficiency; it will also correct the disorder, with the help of supplementary doses of riboflavin and other vitamins.
riboflavin kinase a phosphotransferase enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of free riboflavin and ATP to flavin mononucleotide and ADP.

ri·bo·fla·vin

, riboflavine (rī'bō-flā'vin),
A heat-stable factor of the vitamin B complex with isoalloxazine nucleotides that are coenzymes of the flavodehydrogenases. The daily adult human requirement is 1.7 mg for adult men and 1.3 mg for adult women, with a higher daily requirement during pregnancy and lactation; dietary sources include green vegetables, liver, kidneys, wheat germ, milk, eggs, cheese, and fish.
Synonym(s): flavin (1) , flavine, lactoflavin (2) , vitamin B2 (1)

riboflavin

/ri·bo·fla·vin/ (ri´bo-fla″vin) vitamin B2; a heat-stable, water-soluble flavin of the vitamin B complex, found in milk, organ meats, eggs, leafy green vegetables, whole grains and enriched cereals and breads, and various algae; it is an essential nutrient for humans and is a component of two coenzymes, FAD and FMN, of flavoproteins, which function as electron carriers in oxidation-reduction reactions. Deficiency of the vitamin is known as ariboflavinosis.

riboflavin

(rī′bō-flā′vĭn, -bə-)
n.
An orange-yellow crystalline compound, C17H20N4O6, that is part of the vitamin B complex and is essential for the metabolism of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, occurring naturally in milk, meat, egg yolks, and leafy green vegetables. Also called lactoflavin, vitamin B2.

riboflavin

[ri′bōflā′vin]
Etymology: ribose + L, flavus, yellow
a yellow, crystalline, water-soluble pigment, one of the heat-stable components of the B vitamin complex. It combines with specific flavoproteins and functions as a coenzyme in the oxidative processes of carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Small amounts of riboflavin are found in the liver and kidneys, but it is not stored to any great degree in the body and must be supplied regularly in the diet. Common sources are organ meats, milk, cheese, eggs, green leafy vegetables, meat, whole grains, and legumes. Deficiency of riboflavin is rare and produces cheilosis; local inflammation; desquamation; encrustation; glossitis; photophobia; corneal opacities; proliferation of corneal vessels; seborrheic dermatitis about the nose, mouth, forehead, ears, and scrotum; trembling; sluggishness; dizziness; edema; inability to urinate; and vaginal itching. Also called vitamin B2. See also ariboflavinosis.

riboflavin

A vitamin widely present in foods of plant and animal origin, which combines with phosphate to form the enzyme cofactors flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Riboflavin is involved in oxidation-reduction reactions in many metabolic pathways, and in energy production in the respiratory chain that occurs in the mitochondria.

Dietary sources
Almonds, dairy products, eggs, enriched flour, leafy greens, organ meats, soy products.

riboflavin

Vitamin B2 Nutrition A vitamin which combines with phosphate to form enzyme cofactors flavin mononucleotide–FMN and flavin adenine dinucleotide–FAD, both involved in oxidation-reduction reactions in many metabolic pathways, and in energy production in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. See B complex vitamins, Riboflavin deficiency, Vitamins.

ri·bo·fla·vin

(rī'bō-flā'vin)
A heat-stable factor of the vitamin B complex with isoalloxazine nucleotides that are coenzymes of the flavohydrogenases.
Synonym(s): flavin, flavine, riboflavine.

riboflavin

Vitamin B2. The drug is on the WHO official list.

riboflavin

or

vitamin B2

a member of the B-COMPLEX of water-soluble vitamins. Found in a wide variety of foods, riboflavin is required in the metabolism of all animals (acting as a carrier in the ELECTRON TRANSPORT SYSTEM) and is part of several plant pigments.

riboflavin

part of B-vitamin complex

riboflavin,

n See vitamin B2.

ri·bo·fla·vin

(rī'bō-flā'vin)
Heat-stable factor of vitamin B complex with isoalloxazine nucleotides that are coenzymes of the flavodehydrogenases; dietary sources for this vitamin include green vegetables, liver, kidneys, wheat germ, milk, eggs, cheese, and fish.
Synonym(s): flavin (1) , vitamin B2.

riboflavin (rī´bōflā´vin),

n (vitamin B2),
brand names: many generic sources;
drug class: vitamin B2 water soluble;
action: needed for normal tissue respiratory reactions; functions as a coenzyme;
uses: vitamin B2 deficiency.

riboflavin, riboflavine

vitamin B2, a component of FAD and FMN, which are coenzymes or prosthetic groups for certain enzymes (flavoproteins) that catalyze many oxidation-reduction reactions. Called also vitamin G, lactoflavin.

riboflavin kinase
an enzyme (a phosphotransferase) that catalyzes the conversion of free riboflavin and ATP to flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and ADP. Called also flavokinase.
riboflavin nutritional deficiency
causes conjunctivitis with corneal vascularization, dermatitis, glossitis and muscular weakness. Occurs rarely in dogs, but not a natural deficiency in farm mammals. In birds it causes a fall in egg production, decreased hatchability, curled toe paralysis and poor growth.