rhizoid

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rhizoid

 [ri´zoid]
resembling a root.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd),
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. mycology the rootlike hyphae of fungi that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

/rhi·zoid/ (ri´zoid)
1. resembling a root.
2. a filamentous structure of fungi and some algae that extends into the substrate.

rhizoid

(rī′zoid′)
n.
A slender rootlike filament that grows from an alga, a fungus, or the gametophyte of a moss, liverwort, or fern, used for attachment and nourishment.

rhi′zoid′, rhi·zoi′dal (-zoid′l) adj.

rhizoid

[rī′zoid]
resembling a root or serving to anchor.

rhi·zoid

(rī'zoyd)
1. Rootlike.
2. Irregularly branching, like a root; denoting a form of bacterial growth.
3. In fungi, the rootlike hyphae that arise at the nodes of the hyphae of Rhizopus species.
[rhizo- + G. eidos, resemblance]

rhizoid

a hairlike structure that functions as a root in lower organisms such as certain fungi and mosses. Rhizoids are important in penetrating a substance, giving anchorage and absorbing nutrients.

rhizoid

resembling a root; said of hyphae produced by fungi which infiltrate the substrate.
References in periodicals archive ?
B: first stage of germination, with one rhizoid and a perpendicular first prothallial cell, 11 days.
Plants are attached to the substratum by means of rhizoids.
The aerial portions developed stomates, and the basal portion, rhizoids or root hairs.
Their frondose gametophytes are of the same open repens-type and both produce the same appendages: trichomes and rhizoids in comparable positions.
Rhizoids in tufts on back of leaves, specially at leaf apices, brown, scarcely branched, smooth, frequent.
In testing the viability of the rhizoids after aboveground parts of the plant have been killed, Anderson is collaborating with Susan Williams, director of the University of California at Davis Bodega Marine Laboratory, just north of San Francisco.
It occurs on rocks and as an epiphyte on encrusting forms and develops dense mats of upright filaments [less than or equal to] 1 cm high from prostrate branches firmly attached to the substratum by rhizoids.
However, with long-term infestation or with the weakened immune state that can result from a reduction of normal colon bacteria, the yeast can shift into its fungal form, wherein it develops rhizoids, or roots, that can be implanted in the intestinal wall or other mucosal linings.
Algae lack the various structures that characterize land plants, such as phyllids and rhizoids in nonvascular plants, or leaves, roots, and other organs that are found in tracheophytes.
Classification proposed by Esteves (2011) was used to define biological forms, where: Emergent macrophytes--plants rooted in sediment with leaves out of water; Floating leaved macrophytes--leafy plants floating on the water surface connected to the rhizomes through petioles; Free floating macrophytes --plants that float free of the substrate and their roots remain in the underwater; Rooted submerged macrophytes--plants rooted in the sediment and their vegetative parts remain underwater; Free submerged macrophytes--plants with undeveloped rhizoids and remain in the underwater.
The features that are most useful for distinguishing among Mucorales are the presence of the rhizoids, the shape of sporangium, the length of sporangiophore, and the shape of columella, the presence or absence of apophysis and collarette, and the organization and branching of stolons (3-12).