Rhizobium radiobacter


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Rhizobium radiobacter

(rī-zō′bē-ŭm rā″dē-ō-băk′tĕr) [″ + ″; ″ + ″]
A gram-negative rod that is a rare cause of infection in hospitalized patients, esp. those treated with plastic tubes or catheters. It has long been recognized as a plant pathogen. It has been identified as a human pathogen only in patients with cancers, critical illness, or immunosuppressing illnesses. It was formerly known as Agrobacterium radiobacter.
References in periodicals archive ?
A new study involving two Simon Fraser University scientists has found that Rhizobium radiobacter has on its surface sugar molecules that resemble those on the surface of HIV.
Ralph Pantophlet, a Faculty of Health Sciences assistant professor, and Kate Auyeung, his senior research assistant and lab manager at SFU, and scientists in Italy believe the sugar molecules on Rhizobium radiobacter could be used to trigger our immune system to immediately recognize those on HIV, prompting more immediate awareness of the virus' invasion.
3 Proteus mirabilis 1 Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6 Pseudomonas fluorescens 1 Pseudomonas oryzihabitans 1 Pseudomonas stutzeri 1 Rhizobium radiobacter 1 Roseomonas sp.
Finally, Rhizobium radiobacter is another organism we have recovered only occasionally from swabs but have detected quite often by DNA-based technology.