Rhizobium radiobacter


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Rhizobium radiobacter

(rī-zō′bē-ŭm rā″dē-ō-băk′tĕr) [″ + ″; ″ + ″]
A gram-negative rod that is a rare cause of infection in hospitalized patients, esp. those treated with plastic tubes or catheters. It has long been recognized as a plant pathogen. It has been identified as a human pathogen only in patients with cancers, critical illness, or immunosuppressing illnesses. It was formerly known as Agrobacterium radiobacter.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rhizobium radiobacter B177 UFL, Rhizobium radiobacter DSM 30147T HAM and Spingobacterium mizutaii DSM 11724T HAM.
Sample D & E were indistinguishable in biochemical assays, yet MALDI-Tof adequately differentiated in between the two, indicating that although Sample D & E belonged to the Genus Rhizobium yet were its different serovars, Rhizobium radiobacter B177 UFL & Rhizobium radiobacter DSM 30147T HAM as indicated by their MALDI spectra provided in Fig.
Kinetics and mechanism of reactive Red 141 degradation by a bacterial isolate Rhizobium radiobacter MTCC 8161.
Exopolysaccharides produced by Rhizobium radiobacter S10 in whey and their rheological properties.
El objetivo de este trabajo es informar un caso de EI por Rhizobium radiobacter en un paciente portador de cateter de hemodialisis.
Los resultados de los hemocultivos, reportaron crecimiento de Rhizobium radiobacter sensible a ampicilina, ampicilina/sulbactam, gentamicina, imipenem y resistente a ceftriaxona, ceftazidima y ciprofloxacina.
8%, a diferencia de las otras bases de datos que reportan como especies a Agrobacterium tumefaciens (Blast), Rhizobium radiobacter (Ribosomal Database) y Beijerinckia fluminensis (Bibi Database) (Tabla 6).
A new study involving two Simon Fraser University scientists has found that Rhizobium radiobacter has on its surface sugar molecules that resemble those on the surface of HIV.
Ralph Pantophlet, a Faculty of Health Sciences assistant professor, and Kate Auyeung, his senior research assistant and lab manager at SFU, and scientists in Italy believe the sugar molecules on Rhizobium radiobacter could be used to trigger our immune system to immediately recognize those on HIV, prompting more immediate awareness of the virus' invasion.
Finally, Rhizobium radiobacter is another organism we have recovered only occasionally from swabs but have detected quite often by DNA-based technology.
The same behavior is observed in the reference strains Rhizobium radiobacter NCPPB 2437 (Sawada et al.
6% genetic similarity with Rhizobium radiobacter (Sawada et al.